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 Geoffrey Farthing (1909-2004)
Nicholas
Posted: Apr 9 2008, 09:44 PM


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A strong advocate of HPB's original Theosophy:

http://www.theosophical.ca/DeityCosmosMan-Book1.htm
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Nicholas
Posted: Aug 2 2009, 05:26 PM


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A good survey & introduction to the wonders of Theosophy; Exploring the Great Beyond

http://www.blavatskytrust.org.uk/html/the_...nd_contents.htm
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Lanoo_Harvey
Posted: Jan 9 2010, 09:31 AM


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Geoffrey was already a very old man when I first met him. Although he was unsteady on his feet he still drove his car to Tekels Park. Such was his reputation that as a newcomer to the TS I stood in awe of him, and I consider myself fortunate that he liked my book. He once told me (with a straight face) “there is more in it than you realise”. I’ll take that as a compliment, then.
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Nick the Pilot
Posted: Jan 9 2010, 01:54 PM


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Harvey,

Yes, your book is an important addition to Theosophy's library of books. Whenever someone says they want to read The Secret Doctrine, I always tell them to read your book first.

I never met Mr. Farthing, but he must have been a great man.


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Madame Blavatsky’s aim was to rescue the archaic truths in organized religions which always become distorted and perverted as the centuries go by.
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Lanoo_Harvey
Posted: Jan 10 2010, 10:08 AM


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I appreciate the plugs, Nick, thank you.

There are many others who knew Geoffrey far better than I. The 2004 autumn edition of Insight was a commemorative issue, featuring tributes and extracts from his work. Harold Tarn, Director of the European School of Theosophy, said:
“Geoffrey had so many outstanding qualities and one of the most endearing was his exuberance for the fundamentals of Theosophy. He was wholly dedicated to the promulgation of the works of HPB and in this aspect at least he could be justly called a Great Communicator. On many occasions down through the years I hear him crying “Listen to this! Isn’t this incredible?” And out would tumble some gem which he was bursting to share. Walking with me in his beloved Surrey woods he suddenly stopped, and waving his stick in the air, shouted “Never forget, my friend, there is only One Monad!”

Harold himself is no slouch when it comes to enthusiasm. On one occasion at a conference at Tekels Park I remember berating the senior members of the TS in England for not doing enough to make theosophy attractive to younger people. “What do you mean?” asked Geoffrey. I came up with the usual stuff. “Stop describing branches as lodges; make the teachings of HPB more accessible; hold meetings in modern hotel rooms rather than somebody’s kitchen; write a pop song;” etc. etc. Harold was in favour of writing a pop song there and then. “How do we do it?” he wanted to know.
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alcyone
Posted: Feb 1 2010, 12:03 AM


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In our group we do not mention the word lodge and meet mainly at a university.We are now one of the largest groups in the country.
We have not written a pop song yet!
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Nicholas
Posted: May 29 2010, 05:52 PM


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JSoares
Posted: Jun 12 2010, 09:36 PM


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Dear Friends,

Those who recognize the extraordinary example of life and dedication to the Theosophical Cause of Geoffrey Farthing i´m sure will appreciate this text:



Life And Work of Geoffrey Farthing

The Autobiographic
Testimony Of a Leading Theosophist

Carlos Cardoso Aveline


In the moment one dies ― says esoteric philosophy ― one experiments a detailed revision of the whole lifetime which is coming to a close.

This evaluation only needs one minute or so, from the chronological point of view. Yet its informal preparatory process has extended all along one’s existence ― starting from the very beginning.

The fact is that we humans have a small but renewing death at each night’s sleep, as we go out of our bodies, and a new rebirth every morning, as we come back.

There are strong reasons, then, for the Pythagorean tradition to say that every night students should make a revision of what what they did during the day. “Live each day as if it were your last”, wrote Marcus Aurelius, the Roman emperor who was a philosopher. And Marcus Aurelius was but repeating a lesson from his teacher Musonius Rufus.

In the case of Geoffrey Farthing (1909-2004) we can share part of the content belonging to the revision of a long and fruitful life. One of the practical instruments for this sharing is in the dialogue below, which also presents us with some significant scenes of British history, and a bit of life’s flavor according to a remarkable truth-seeker. [1]

Farthing was one of the best-known theosophical leaders and authors in the second half of the 20th century. When he died in 30 May 2004 ― at 94 ― he had friends all over the world. His books were translated only into Spanish language, perhaps ― a task well done by José Ramón Sordo in Mexico ―; yet Farthing’s inspiring influence was much more widely spread than his writings.

In February 2000, he wrote in an letter to his friends around the world:

“After fifty years of fairly intense study I have come to the conclusion that the original outpouring of occult knowledge from the Masters, to the extent that they then gave it out, was a unique world event. It has not been properly appreciated as such.”

This idea is at the core of Farthing’s legacy to students of esoteric philosophy in the 21st century.

When the following questions were submitted to him, in November 2000, many could see the central importance that Geoffrey Farthing’s work had had in keeping at least part of the Adyar TS open to the real Theosophy and free from its false versions.

His answers were sent both by email and air mail in a paper document signed by him. In the dialogue, he makes a revision of this lifetime and discusses the theosophical movement, its illusions and its future.

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QUESTION ONE

When and where were you born?

FARTHING -- I was born in a place called Heaton Mersey near Manchester in Lancashire, England, on 10th December 1909. The place was a small community clustered round a dye-works. In those days Lancashire supplied the best part of the world with cotton goods. My father used to say that the mills there could satisfy the U.K. home demand working a few hours on Saturday morning. All the rest was exported. It was a period of expansion and prosperity just prior to the outbreak of the 1st World War. I remember that event. We were on holiday in a place called St Anne’s-on-Sea and I had been sent at breakfast-time to the local newsagent to get the daily papers. I then had a few copper coins to pay for them. I handed the man the money and I can remember him saying, “When you go home tell your father that war has been declared.” That did not mean much to me then but I know it caused a good deal of excitement at home. Little did we know what we were in for. Apart from the plethora of stories about the 1st World War that there are, our family was one of the tragic ones. My mother lost all of her 7 brothers: 5 of them were killed outright, 2 of them were gassed and died later.

I went to a local Nursery School. One day sitting in the classroom we heard a droning noise and the teacher said, “That’s an aeroplane”, and we all went outside to see this thing in the sky. I do not remember the date of that but it was somewhere between 1914 and 1916. Only the well-to-do had motor cars then. We were fortunate enough to have the use of one which belonged to my father’s company (The General Electric Company of England). My next school was some miles away; this involved a journey in a very rattly solid-tyred autobus. Horses had mostly been superceded for public transport but they were used still for commercial purposes, especially by tradesmen for delivery purposes. The heavier horse-drawn vehicles were replaced for a relatively short time by steam-powered ones. These were superceded by petrol-driven lorries, vans, etc., soon after the war.

We got our first telephone a few years after the war had started. You had to wind a handle to call the exchange, where the operator knew all the subscribers by name, or an any rate all the local ones. I do not remember that there was such a thing as a telephone directory. There was no radio (or wireless as it was then called).

Eventually at the age of about 10 I went to a boarding school at Eastbourne where I was reasonably happy and enjoyed playing the team games that were then the fashion such as cricket and rugby football. After that, at the age of 13 or 14 I went to an English Public School (very private and fee-paying) in Buckinghamshire. The school was situated in the large house, virtually a palace, that had belonged at one time to the Dukes of Buckingham, set in 500 acres of beautiful parkland and gardens. I was indeed happy there. I passed the requisite exams at an early age and thereafter entered what was called the Upper School where one then enjoyed the use of a private study together with one other student colleague. That was good fun but of course I was far too young to be granted the privilege and thereafter did nearly no work until I was 17. However, I certainly enjoyed every minute of my time in that beautiful place.

One point of interest about my school life was that I was very attracted to the Church services. These played a significant part in my life. Another significant event was our preparation for ‘Confirmation’. This is when one is confirmed into the Anglican Church. The ceremony is conducted by a Bishop; in this case it was the Bishop of Oxford. The preparation took about a year, i.e. 3 terms at school, and they were conducted by my form Master who was an ordained Parson - an elderly man whom everybody liked and who was obviously very sincere in his religious beliefs. Some of this brushed off onto us. We were given a terrific build-up about what Confirmation meant: we were going to be admitted into the companionship of Christ; we would be endowed with strength to combat our sins and weaknesses; we would be in a fellowship of like-minded people also dedicated to Christian service - in other words a close-knit and holy fellowship.

On the day of Confirmation I was very excited. During the service I could hardly contain myself until it came my turn to be blessed by the Bishop. I can remember him moving along boy by boy from the right until it came my turn, and then the laying-on of hands. I waited expectantly for all the wonderful things we had been told would happen. I waited in vain - nothing happened! I got up and filed out with the other boys very dejected. Why had I been rejected? Why had I not been admitted to this fellowship that we had heard so much about? Why was I not endowed with strength? I asked one of the other boys what had happened to him and he very mater-of-fact replied, “Nothing, what did you expect?” I could hardly believe it. Was all that preparation we had been through a charade for nothing? That was probably the beginning of my quest which led me into Theosophy.

After leaving school I became an apprentice in a large electrical engineering works near Manchester. At the same time I attended night school to get some theoretical qualifications. The significance of this experience from a theosophical point of view is that I made the acquaintance of an Indian who was also apprenticed at the same works and we used to have lunch together. The conversation got round to religion fairly early on. He was a Brahmin and very well versed in the Indian scriptures. I got another view altogether of religion from him but was amazed when eventually he said that all the wonderful things that he had told me about their scriptures he no longer believed. He had become completely westernized; his views were entirely dictated by scientific knowledge and thought. However, he had opened my eyes to another point of view altogether and set me thinking. (...)

[Keep reading at http://www.esoteric-philosophy.com/2010/05...y-farthing.html]


Fraternal greetings,
Quim




[SIZE=7]www.esoteric-philosophy.comwww.esoteric-philosophy.com
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Nick the Pilot
Posted: Jun 13 2010, 03:46 AM


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"I asked one of the other boys what had happened to him and he very mater-of-fact replied, “Nothing, what did you expect?” I could hardly believe it. Was all that preparation we had been through a charade for nothing? That was probably the beginning of my quest which led me into Theosophy."

--> I agree that religion sometimes sets us up to think that 'religion' means having happy emotional experiences, and to look to religion to supply us with such emotional experiences. Fortunately, Theosophy teaches us to take a different view.


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Madame Blavatsky’s aim was to rescue the archaic truths in organized religions which always become distorted and perverted as the centuries go by.
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Quim
Posted: Jun 16 2010, 07:45 AM


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Friends,

Geofrey Farthing was a brave example of a Adyar theosophist deep committed to discover the truth.

I will quote again some parts of the autobiographic article “Life And Work of Geoffrey Farthing”:


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"How did you discover the enormous distance in occult quality between the original exposition of Theosophy (HPB-Masters) and its second version, by C.W. Leadbeater and Annie Besant? Did you have, then, a sense of having lost time?

FARTHING -- My discovery of the differences came about from John Coats having given me a copy of “The Mahatma Letters”, with their detailed account of what happens after death. This account does not reconcile with what is given in the Leadbeater/Besant literature. One of the major differences is the matter of the Etheric Double. I could simply not reconcile the two teachings on that score. At first I felt that I was not understanding either of them properly and that the limitation was mine. I could not believe that well-informed and gifted people like Leadbeater and Besant had ‘got it wrong’. Somehow or another the fault lay in me and I wrestled over this problem for perhaps 2 years. During this time I studied in detail the classification of man’s principles from both points of view (e.g. Blavatsky in “The Key to Theosopohy”) and tried hard to reconcile them, but they are not reconcilable. Eventually of course this led to my publishing the booklet “The Etheric Double?”.

Another point of great difficulty was the Masters’ views on religion and the close association of the Liberal Catholic church with the Theosophical Society. This again is irreconcilable.

As to my reactions on making these discoveries, I had been so long in the process that I was not surprised or dismayed but I do remember having to make a decision as to whether from then on I was going to accept the Masters as teachers or the Leadbeater/Besant partnership. In the light of all the evidence obviously it had to be the Masters and H.P.B., and this I did. Having made that decision everything else seemed to fall into place. All the problems and difficulties were eradicated."

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The complete article can be read at: http://www.esoteric-philosophy.com/2010/05...y-farthing.html


Quim



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Aldebaran
Posted: Sep 4 2011, 02:55 PM


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Today, I read a letter that Farthing wrote in 1976 to Mr. I.K. Taimni, Director of the Outer Head of the ES of TS Adyar.

It is of value even today. Many of Farthing's criticisms are still relevant.



http://www.filosofiaesoterica.com/ler.php?id=1244

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Lanoo_Harvey
Posted: Sep 4 2011, 04:54 PM


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Sadly, Aldebaran, the TS seems unwilling to contemplate change; then as now.
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