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 Canadian Underworld, All but Bikers
presley1000
Posted: Jan 31 2007, 01:30 PM


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Here's the Toronto Star version of the story Hollander posted...

Link to original article

Gun peddler duped in Operation Pun
Undercover officer posed as biker at gun show and offered to purchase arms for native gang
Jan 31, 2007 04:30 AM
Nick Pron
Courts Bureau

A 62-year-old woman with a respectable day job selling windows was leading a double life, secretly "making a buck" on the side as a gun dealer, a Toronto court was told yesterday.

But what Ingeborg Anna Richter didn't realize, the court heard, was that one of her main customers was actually an undercover police officer, who claimed he was buying the weapons for a native gang based in Winnipeg.

A judge didn't buy Richter's defence that she believed the guns were just vintage weapons, and unusable – or that it was really her husband, renowned criminal Charles Yanover, who was the weapons trafficker in the family. She was found guilty yesterday of 31 gun-related charges.

Richter was taken into custody and will be sentenced on March 9.

Justice Andromahi Karakatsanis noted in her ruling that Richter was sometimes "aggressive" in negotiating deals with two undercover police officers.

In one sale of a shotgun, she described the weapon as a "beauty" and tried to sell it for $1,400, before cutting a deal for $1,000.

"They want it, the Indians will buy that ... any Indians will buy that ... anyone will instantly buy it off of you the minute he sees it," the judge said, in quoting Richter's conversation with the undercover officer.

"We make a buck, you make a buck, who cares what happens afterwards."

Yanover and Richter were the targets of a police investigation in 2002, code-named Operation Pun, when it was suspected the couple was selling vintage World War II sten guns and submachine guns.

Yanover was once known as the master of the scam, a con man who duped the Ku Klux Klan into believing he could help them take over the Caribbean island of Dominica and turn it into a haven for white supremacists.

He was sentenced in 2004 to nine years for his role in the gun dealing.

Detective Andrew Johnson told the court earlier that he had been posing as a biker when he met the couple at a gun show in early 2002, and made his first purchase, later doing deals with a second undercover officer.

At the time, Yanover was driving a water taxi to the Toronto Islands.

It was a far cry from his glory days as a con artist when he got $600,000 for convincing North Korean officials that he could assassinate the president of South Korea at a golf tournament.

In secretly recorded conversations, Richter was overhead telling Yanover that they could trust Johnson because he "had lots to hide," the judge noted in her ruling.

In another call, Richter complained that she didn't get "my end" of the sale of a silencer for a handgun.

The judge noted that while it was Yanover's passion for guns that drew Richter into the clandestine world of trafficking in weapons, she became "increasingly involved in the sales ... motivated by her desire and need for money."

Richter had been free on bail but prosecutor David Mitchell told the judge that Richter, who has a criminal record for fraud, was convicted of a "very serious offence" and should be jailed until her sentencing hearing in March.

Her lawyer, Kingsley Graham, said that Richter had lost her home, was broke and needed some time in the community to "wrap up her affairs" before her sentencing hearing.

But Karatatsanis disagreed and Richter was led away in handcuffs.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 13 2007, 11:58 AM


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Older article below, found online at http://thechronicleherald.ca/NovaScotia/556357.html, discusses victims and perpetrators of fraud in Atlantic Canada (the eastern region of Canada, closer to the Atlantic Ocean) and the United States: both scams originating in Atlantic Canada and targeting American consumers or frauds originating in the US and targeting Atlantic Canadians. In other parts of Canada, the Mafia and Hells Angels have been implicated in these types of scams.

Published: 2007-02-01

The bilk of human blindness
Atlantic Canadians likely cheated out of $7 million in 2006 by complex cross-border swindles, fraud fighter says


By KELLY SHIERS Staff Reporter

Thousands of Atlantic Canadians shelled out millions of dollars to scammers last year, according to the best guess of those fighting the fraudsters.

But the extent of the problem remains a bit of a mystery, according to the Competition Bureau’s Derm Jardine, who chaired a meeting in Halifax Wednesday of law enforcement agencies dealing with cross-border fraud in the U.S. and Atlantic Canada.

Figures presented to the Atlantic Partnership Combatting Cross Border Fraud showed more than 500 Atlantic Canadians lost a total of more than $700,000 in 2006 to such scams as bogus lotteries, job offers and investment opportunities and phoney charities.

But Mr. Jardine said fewer than 10 per cent of victims actually report the crime, leaving officials to believe far more people lost far more money than those numbers indicate.

"It means, in fact, about 5,000 people were victims and they lost about $7 million in Atlantic Canada," he said in an interview.

Across the country, it’s estimated that Canadians lose between $3 billion and $10 billion annually to these kinds of scams.

Halifax Regional Police Det. Wallace Caldwell said scams are always changing and are tailored to the victims.

In one Internet scheme, a local woman who exchanged photos with someone she only met online, received a photo that appeared to show the man beat up and a plea asking for money because he’d been attacked and robbed in a foreign country.

In another case, a person sent about $3,000 to someone he met online so she could buy a plane ticket. He never heard from her again.

In yet another scheme, a local teen went online and found a part-time job, paying bills for a company. He was told to deposit a $40,000 cheque into his own bank account, then use that money to pay his new employer’s bills, keeping a percentage of the money for himself.

By the time the bank informed him that the cheque was bogus and that he was responsible for any money lost, he’d already withdrawn $17,000 and wired it off to the phoney creditors, Det. Caldwell said.

Investigators stressed that victims don’t come from one particular age group or educational level.

"They’re looking for anybody who has the means to send (them) money, plain and simple. That can be people who are well-educated, people that are young, old — it doesn’t matter. Scammers don’t really care about who you are or where you are," said Det.-Const. Dana Drover, also of the Halifax Regional Police.

The Atlantic Partnership was formed to investigate and prosecute deceptive marketing practices that originate in Atlantic Canada and target American consumers, or that originate from the U.S. and target Atlantic Canadians, Mr. Jardine said, adding that Canada has gotten a bad reputation in other countries as a haven for scam artists.

"We are very much concerned about the reputation of Canada . . . as being a home to deceptive telemarketers," he said.

While Mr. Jardine said he’s not sure cross-border fraud is on the rise, he does know that the kinds of schemes are changing.

"What we’re seeing is it’s becoming much more complex and much more sophisticated and . . . is becoming much more driven by organized crime.

"In Quebec, Ontario, Vancouver, the mafia, the Hells Angels . . . have all been implicated in some of these (frauds). . . .

""What we’re finding is a lot of these are being driven by organized crime because they’re generating huge amounts of cash. They launder that cash and they use it for other illegal activities such as buying drugs, distributing drugs."

Investigating cross-border frauds can be very difficult, said Det.-Const. Drover.

Perpetrators "literally hide in the electronic shadows of today’s world. . . . They can be very anonymous on a keyboard halfway around the world," he said.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 13 2007, 01:47 PM


Toto Riina
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Article below is online at http://www.thestar.com/News/article/179163. Please note Brampton is a city in the Greater Toronto Area.

$20M of cocaine found in carrot truck
February 07, 2007
Bob Mitchell
Staff Reporter

A Brampton man has been charged in connection with a surprise discovery of uncut cocaine inside a transport truck that police say could have been turned into $20 million worth of street sales.

Heavily armed tactical officers with Halton Police stood guard today as more than 200 kilos of the illegal narcotic were displayed during a news conference.

Few specific details about the discovery are being revealed, including how and why an alert citizen's suspicions led to what police are describing as Halton's largest-ever cocaine seizure.

Halton morality officers are now working with federal and provincial police agencies to determine whether biker gangs are involved in the shipment that likely originated in Colombia.

"We're only at the first steps of a mammoth investigation," Det. Insp. Chris Perkins of Halton's morality bureau said today during a news conference at Halton Police headquarters in Oakville.

Police said dangerous organized crime ties are preventing them from providing much information about the citizen whose actions last Sunday morning led to police discovering the drugs inside a produce transport truck travelling east on Highway 401 toward Toronto.

"Somebody has been pissed off since Sunday," said Det.. Glenn Mannella of Halton's morality unit said, when asked about the financial blow delivered to the criminal element expecting the cocaine.

Drug officers say it's quite likely somebody now owes somebody a lot of money for the intercepted drugs, a serious problem that could have far-reaching effects throughout the drug underworld in Canada, the United States and South America.

The drugs found last Sunday about 9:30 a.m. were contained in 205 different packages of 1 kilo bricks inside the back of a tractor trailer carrying carrots and carrot juice. Police said the drugs, before being cut for street use, are worth about $8 million.

Police said the truck entered Canada from the United States earlier in the day but won't reveal where the truck was coming from or where it was headed.

Investigators suspect the magnitude of the drug haul and the fact it appears to be uncut, indicates the narcotics came from a source, rather than from another distributor.

"Somewhere, someone is upset they lost a significant amount of money. . . I suspect they're concerned. . . They have been dealt a financial blow," said Det. Insp. Perkins.

"This represents a lot of potential criminal activity from a sophisticated group responsible for the transporting of a shipment of such size and value."

Police said a Brampton truck driver arrested for drug trafficking worked for a legitimate trucking company and the produce has since been delivered to its owner.

Investigators won't reveal how long the driver had been on the road or what information they've so far obtained from examining his logs. But investigators believe he was well aware of what he was transporting.

Morality officers said cocaine is usually transported in shipping containers, not via transport trucks, which usually haul marijuana across Canada and into the United States.

Investigators aren't certain whether they accidentally stumbled upon a new pipeline for the delivery of cocaine or whether the drug has been shipped before in this manner and only now been discovered.

Only brief information about how the drugs were discovered has been released so far. Essentially, police said an alert citizen initially engaged the truck driver in a conversation by the side of the road in the area of James Snow Parkway and Steeles Ave. in Milton. Afterwards, the driver left and headed toward Highway 401, travelling east toward Toronto.

For some reason, the driver followed the truck and managed to get the truck driver's attention again and the two vehicles pulled over onto the shoulder of the eastbound lanes. Soon afterward, a ministry of transportation enforcement officer was driving by, saw the two vehicles parked by the side of the road and stopped to see if he could be of any assistance.

"He became suspicious and contacted police," Det. Mannella said. Drug officers executed a search warrant and found the drugs in plain view in front of the produce after the rear door of the trailer was opened, police said.

Although police believe the drugs came from its source — and likely South America — investigators haven't positively determined whether the drugs were on the truck when it passed through customs or whether they were added to the cargo somewhere in Ontario before they were discovered.

Det. Insp Perkins said police know "the ultimate" destination of the produce but won't reveal what that was or whether they believe the truck was headed to the Ontario Food Terminal in Toronto.

"Hopefully, this will lead to other arrests because the sheer magnitude of it indicates a sophisticated group is connected to the transport of the drugs," Det. Insp Perkins said. "We're just in the first steps of a mammoth investigation."

Morality Det. Const. Paul Foley said there were specific markings on the drugs indicating what drug group is behind the shipment but he wouldn't reveal any more details.

"We have an idea of the route (where drugs came from) but we can't say," Foley said. "The drugs could have been put into the truck after it crossed into Ontario. Not every truck is inspected at the border.

"No effort was made to conceal the drugs inside the truck."

Avtar Sandhu, 39, of Brampton, has been charged with possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 13 2007, 01:52 PM


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Article below, found at http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs...l=1014656511815, is from a newspaper in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Iraqi club shooting 'attempted murder': police
By Susan Clairmont
The Hamilton Spectator(Feb 9, 2007)

The eight masked men who stormed into an Iraqi social club and repeatedly shot the manager were there to kill him.

The investigation into the "blitz-style attack" has been turned over to the major crime unit which is calling it an attempted murder, says Staff Sergeant Ian Matthews. The unit is also investigating vicious assaults on the two patrons unlucky enough to have been in the Ishtar Cafe at the time.

"There was immediate violence and very specific violence directed at the victim who was shot," Matthews says. "It was a very targeted attack."

As for why the manager was fired at, a good clue might be the giant video gaming terminal found on its side outside the club's front door after the attackers fled the scene.

"Obviously, the gaming machine has something to do with it," Matthews says. "It was out on the front lawn. It was removed from the club during the course of this offence."

He adds that over the years there have been other social clubs in the area that have erupted in violence because of connections with gaming machines and the organized crime families who often control them. In some of those incidents, gaming machines were forcibly removed from clubs.

Indeed, just a week ago, four armed men stole a gaming machine from a James Street North bar. And in July 2004, three men tried to steal a video lottery terminal from a Greek social club on King Street East but were stopped by the patrons.

Business owners are forced by criminals to have the games and then pay them a hefty percentage of the intake.

It's not illegal to own a gaming machine, so long as no cash winnings are paid out, according to Matthews.

Just before 7 p.m. on Tuesday night, eight men in masks burst into the nearly empty private club. Without giving anyone a chance to comply with any demands, they opened fire on the manager. Police said he was shot twice in the stomach with a handgun.

Detectives have talked with the 41-year-old shooting victim who has undergone surgery, but they haven't been able to formally interview him.

The attackers beat two other men who just happened to be there. One, who is 48, suffered serious head injuries and is stable but unconscious. The other, aged 55, also has head injuries and remains in hospital. Police have said a baseball bat was used in the beatings.

Nobody saw what direction the men went when they left the scene or how they got away. Police have seized a videotape that they're hoping will show them if there was a getaway car.

The crime scene is a challenge for forensic specialists. With eight suspects involved, there is a lot of evidence to sift through. As of last night -- 48 hours after the shooting -- the club was still being examined.

"There were eight different sets of shoes walking in there," says Matthews. The gaming machine is also still being examined for forensic evidence.

So far, homicide and divisional detectives have interviewed about a dozen people, including club members who arrived just after the attack. Many of those interviews were done with the help of interpreters from the Iraqi community.

Matthews says he is confident the attack was not racially motivated and adds the police service's hate crime unit is not involved in the case.

The club at Concession and East 16th streets just opened last November and caters to men and women in the Assyrian and Kurdish communities. Customers play dominoes and cards but do not drink. The club does not have a liquor licence and its patrons are mainly Muslims who do not consume alcohol. City licensing officials and police beat officers have done spot checks of the club in the past and never found alcohol inside. Or any gambling. Or any problems at all.

Just one neighbour has lodged complaints with the police and the city about the club over issues of parking and noise. City officials said they've never had any reason to levy a fine under the noise bylaw, but did tell the club's owner recently that it is not in compliance with the bylaws for parking requirements. The owner said he intended to apply for a minor variance.

Ward 7 Councillor Scott Duvall says he has received a few calls in the last couple of days from constituents asking if there were illegal activities taking place at the club which led to the violence.

"These people (who were injured) were the victims," says Duvall. "I don't want the community to say they're bad people when they haven't done anything wrong."
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 13 2007, 02:16 PM


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Article below can be found at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/sto...tional/Ontario/.

Recent rash of diamond-safe thefts sends shudder through industry
TIMOTHY APPLEBY
Feb 10, 2007

After thieves cleaned out the twin safes of a north Toronto diamond wholesaler last weekend, netting a multimillion-dollar haul of cut and uncut stones, some apprehension rippled through Canada's flourishing precious-gems industry.

"It does seem to be a sign of the times and it's pretty unusual," said John Lamont, director of loss prevention for Jewellers Vigilance Canada Inc., listing a string of recent Toronto-area robberies targeting jewellers.

"From our records, which we've been keeping for about four years, we haven't a rash of incidents where they've attacked safes. This has happened many times on the other side of the border. My concern now is that we may have had [gem thieves] cross over into Canada."

And if there is an upswing in jewellery heists, Mr. Lamont suggests, the reporting requirements spawned by tighter U.S. and Canadian money-laundering laws may help explain why.

Retail break-ins represent only part of the allure that jewels in general, and diamonds in particular, hold for the underworld. Canada's trade in diamonds has soared in the past few years, with domestic production in the Far North fuelling a business that places it third among the world's 23 diamond-producing nations, with a turnover worth more than $2-billion each year.

The boom has been accompanied by repeated warnings that diamonds -- small, easy to authenticate, readily transported and concealed -- are a natural magnet for organized crime.

When Prime Minister Stephen Harper officiated at the opening of Canada's third diamond mine last August in Nunavut, the RCMP used the occasion to warn that mobsters have already gained a toehold in the diamond business.

In its 2005 annual report, Criminal Intelligence Service Canada said the same thing, warning that the industry's chief vulnerability is through organized-crime figures installing individuals in jobs allowing them to "gain access to important industry information or acquire a supply of rough stones illicitly."

So far that appears not to have happened on any appreciable scale, security consultant and ex-Mountie Chris Mathers said.

Both the multinational mine owners and the manufacturers who turn rough stones into finished products "watch the watchers," Mr. Mathers said.

"Unless you're prepared to do a significant armed assault on one of these places you'll have a hard time getting anything out of them. The way they set up security in the diamond organizations is with a very strong segregation of duties and knowledge.

"I may know that there's going to be a shipment but I won't know when. And the guy that knows when, doesn't know the quantity that's being moved. And the guy who knows the quantity doesn't know who else is going to be working that day."

But the retail level is a different story, Mr. Mathers said, concurring with the notion that precious stones and metals have long served as a useful currency substitute for criminals, "particularly for people trying to move wealth from one jurisdiction to another."

In the case of last weekend's spectacular robbery at Gem Star Inc. on Finch Avenue, pulled off after elaborate preparations that included cutting the telephone lines into the building, the thieves scored a bonanza.

The initial police report estimated the loot to have been worth more than $5-million, a figure that has since been scaled down. The take was nonetheless substantial -- hundreds of cut and uncut diamonds, stored in safes that were sliced open with high-powered cutting tools -- and much of it will be easily disposed of.

Uncut diamonds are "virtually untraceable," said Sergeant Lino Murarotto of North York's 32 Division.

For Gem Star co-owner Bhushan Vora, the only good news was that his diamonds were insured. Not so in the case of at least one of the other four jewellery robberies that have occurred in Southern Ontario since October and are now under fresh scrutiny.

Two took place in Scarborough, one occurred in Peel Region, and one was carried out near Niagara Falls. And while the Gem Star break-in is the only one in which the haul was exclusively diamonds -- gold, watches and other precious stones accounted for the rest -- the connecting thread in all instances was the successful targeting of safes and vaults.

There was planning, too, in all cases.

The two Scarborough robberies involved breaking into units adjoining the jewellery outlets and then cutting holes in the connecting walls.

But diamonds -- weight-for-weight the most valuable of precious stones -- are special.

"What I'm hearing on the street is that diamonds are becoming the currency of choice for the drug trade, which makes sense," a police source familiar with the investigation said.

And while Shlomo Drazin, president of the Diamond Manufacturers Association of Canada, perceives "no epidemic" of robberies, he acknowledges retail outlets' vulnerability.

"The industry has always been a target, just like banks, both in the retail and the wholesale end of it," Mr. Drazin said. "It's an easily marketable item."
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 13 2007, 02:19 PM


Toto Riina
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Article below is online at http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news...867a47c&k=36966. Please note B.C. is an acronym for British Columbia, a Canadian province.

Police track B.C. pot expertise south of the border
Matthew Ramsey
CanWest News Service; Vancouver Province

Sunday, February 11, 2007

VANCOUVER - A different kind of brain drain is underway in B.C. as pot growers share their billions of dollars worth of skills with a worldwide audience.

"We think they're exporting their expertise," said Supt. Paul Nadeau, director of the RCMP's national drug branch.

"We've heard of it on an international scale."

Nadeau says he's in regular contact with law-enforcement counterparts in the United States, Australia and New Zealand, and all report busting grow-ops with links, either direct or indirect, to organized crime groups operating in B.C.

Ironically, it's enhanced border security in the post 9/11 U.S. that is driving the information-sharing and possibly adding an unintended front to America's "war on drugs."

Why cross the border from Canada with a load of high-grade marijuana when you can find people willing and schooled in how to grow it for you in the U.S.? That may be the scenario playing out in a recent Washington state bust.

U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency officers and police in King County took down a large grow-op ring three weeks ago, arresting seven people and seizing an estimated $5 million USof marijuana (4,991 plants) and more than $250,000 in cash.

"Detectives believe all those houses raided are part of a large, criminal organization with connections to British Columbia," said Sgt. John Urquhart of the King County sheriffs department.

"This is basically the 'B.C. bud' transplanted to Washington," Urquhart said. "This is not the first time."

Urquhart was reluctant to expand on the nature of the connections and the organization involved.

But when Nadeau was asked who in B.C. is exporting their skills, his answer was simple -"Everybody."

"Everybody (organized crime groups)is into it (marijuana production)in B.C. There's a lot of money to be made," he said.

A study released by the Fraser Institute in 2006 pegged the retail value of marijuana grown in B.C. at $7 billion and estimated there are at least 17,500 grow-ops in the province.

Adam Otte, a DEA special agent, noted in Seattle District Court documents that the seven Vietnamese-American suspects arrested in Washington were seen at multiple grow-ops.

"I believe they were an organized crime group of marijuana growers who helped tend their associate's grows," Otte stated.

"It comes down to the business of huge profits," said Darryl Plecas, University College of the Fraser Valley criminology professor and author of the 2002 study Marihuana Operations in British Columbia.

"What's happening there (in Washington State)is characteristic of organized crime in general. They go wherever there's an opportunity," Plecas said.

Nor should it be surprising, says Julian Sher, award-winning author of The Road to Hell: How Biker Gangs Conquered Canada.

Sher points to an example of intelligence sharing in his book, where he documents how a Hells Angel acquired a recipe for the drug speed in a California jail, then promptly exported that recipe to colleagues in Australia for production.

"Technology, like drugs and money, flows very quickly in the organized crime world," said Sher. "It stands to reason that B.C., where the grow-ops are the biggest cash crop, that technology flows east and south."
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 14 2007, 11:38 AM


Toto Riina
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Article below, currently online at http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/sto...y/National/home, is about movie piracy and counterfeiting of DVDs, among other things, in Canada. Outlaw biker gangs such as the Hells Angels in Quebec, the Italian Mafia, and Asian gangs such as the Big Circle Boys in Ontario have piracy tools at their disposal.

U.S. group wants Canada blacklisted over piracy
BARRIE MCKENNA
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Feb 14, 2007

WASHINGTON — A powerful coalition of U.S. software, movie and music producers is urging the Bush administration to put Canada on an infamous blacklist of intellectual property villains, alongside China, Russia and Belize.

Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections, the International Intellectual Property Alliance complains in a submission to the U.S. government.

The time has come for the United States to send a stern warning to Prime Minister Stephen Harper's government, which has failed to deliver on a promised overhaul of copyright laws and a policing crackdown, said the Washington-based group that represents companies such as Microsoft, Apple and Paramount Pictures.

“The industry groups feel very strongly that we need to ratchet this up,” IIPA legal counsel Steve Metalitz said.

“The disturbing thing is that the Canadian government doesn't seem to take this very seriously.”

He pointed out that the Harper government hasn't even drafted new copyright legislation.

The United States first placed Canada on a lower-priority watch list three years ago. Elevating Canada to the “priority watch list,” as the U.S. industry now wants, would put it among a select group of notorious copyright pirates, such as Belize, Venezuela, China, Turkey, Indonesia, Ukraine and Russia.

“Canada's long tenure on the USTR watch list seems to have had no discernible effect on its copyright policy,” the group lamented in a submission this week to U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab, George W. Bush's trade czar.

Once put on notice, failure to address U.S. concerns could result in trade challenges at the World Trade Organization, plus possible sanctions.

Officials at Industry Canada, which oversees copyright laws, would not directly address the U.S. industry's concerns yesterday, nor would they say when new legislation might be ready.

“The government of Canada is working actively on the copyright file and will take the time necessary to ensure that revisions to this important framework legislation have been fully thought through,” Industry Canada spokesman David Dummer said.

The complaint says Canada has emerged as “a leading exporter” of bootlegged copies of the latest movies as well as so-called mod chips, which are used to circumvent anti-piracy technology built into popular video game consoles, such as Sony PlayStation 2, Microsoft Xbox and Nintendo Game Cube.

“The problem of unauthorized camcording of films in Canadian theatres is now nearing crisis levels,” the group complained. It estimates that in 2006 as many as a quarter of all bootlegged films sold worldwide were made in Canada.

Unlike in the United States and most other developed countries, videotaping movies in theatres is not illegal in Canada. Likewise, there is no law in Canada that specifically bans mod chips and other piracy tools, as there is in the United States.

Making and distributing the chips has become so lucrative that the thriving business is now dominated by organized-crime rings, including the Hells Angels in Quebec and the Big Circle Boys in Ontario and British Columbia, according to the IIPA.

“Highly organized international-crime groups have rushed into the gap left by Canada's outmoded copyright law and now use the country as a springboard from which to undermine legitimate markets in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and elsewhere,” the group said.

The industry paints a grim picture of Canada as a country where copyright pirates operate with impunity because of lax laws, poor enforcement and a laissez-faire attitude.

“Canada remains far behind virtually all of its peers in the industrialized world with respect to its efforts to bring its copyright laws up to date with the realities of the global digital networked environment,” the group argued in its submission.

“Indeed, even the major developing countries have progressed further and faster than Canada in meeting the challenge.”

A spokesman for Ms. Schwab, the U.S. trade czar, was not immediately available for comment.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 17 2007, 10:21 PM


Toto Riina
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Article below is found at http://www.hamiltonspectator.com/NASApp/cs...l=1014656511815 in the online edition of this newspaper in Hamilton, Ontario.

Violent attack tied to extortion plot: police
By Paul Morse
The Hamilton Spectator (Feb 17, 2007)

The men who shot a Mountain club manager and beat two customers over the head with a baseball bat described themselves as mobsters, say police.

Investigators have charged two men in last week's attack and attempted extortion at the Ishtar Cafe, an Assyrian and Kurdish club on Concession Street. They are seeking a third man.

Police say the gang had been pushing the club to use its illegal gaming machines since November. The attack occurred after the owner refused.

Police are now hunting Ioannis (John) Chrisanthopoulos, 47, a violent Hamilton career criminal known as Johnny The Greek, who spent time in prison for kidnapping, assault, extortion and uttering death threats.

Thursday's arrests come nine days after the masked group shot a 41-year-old manager of the Ishtar Cafe twice in the stomach and beat him. The man remains in serious condition.

"As part of their extortion, they made insinuations they are part of Italian organized crime in Hamilton," said major crimes Detective Sergeant Ian Matthews yesterday.

"The entire Assyrian and Kurdish community have taken this as a personal attack on their private club where they socialize ... and they have gone out of their way to assist us," he said. "The victims have absolutely no connection to organized crime."

The club's operator was singled out to enforce the extortion, Matthews said.

Illegal gaming machines are a favourite of organized crime because they force the private club or tavern to take all the risk in the event of a police raid. Johnny (Pops) Papalia, one of the most powerful crime bosses in Hamilton history, was heavily involved in illegal gaming, said Antonio Nicaso, a prominent expert on Italian organized crime.

But since Papalia was murdered on a Hamilton street in 1997, Nicaso said, organized crime in town has diversified.

"Now there is a tendency in Hamilton for people to pull together in a no-name brand of organized crime," he said.

Nikolaos Badounas, 47, and Christo Chrisanthopoulos, 44, both of Hamilton, have been charged with extortion.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 27 2007, 09:17 AM


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The article below, found at http://winnipegsun.com/Comment/Editorial/2...17/3641876.html, concerns the renewed debate about the legalization of drugs as a way to curb organized crime from dealing them.

February 18, 2007

Drug profits and the big picture
By John Gleeson, Editorial Page Editor

Winnipeg Sun columnist Robert Marshall’s Valentine’s Day column was almost worth a news story.

Because in that column, Marshall, a retired and highly respected veteran of the Winnipeg Police Service, added his name to the growing list of credible cops from across North America who are arguing that the war against drugs is a folly of monumental proportions.

How monumental?

How does $400 billion a year sound?

That’s the estimated annual profit to organized crime from the drug trade worldwide. That means each year, as long as drug prohibition continues to be enforced as the law of the land, organized crime grows $400 billion richer, $400 billion stronger.

Law enforcement can’t compete with that kind of money stacked up against it. The only way society can win this war is to remove those profits. And, as Marshall wrote, “that can only be done by legalizing drugs. By making it a governmental responsibility to regulate, control and most importantly to keep them out of the hands of children.”

It’s the same conclusion reached by the Fraser Institute in a ground-breaking report several years ago, yet it’s one the Conservative party of Stephen Harper seems to stubbornly and emphatically ignore.

Many Conservative voters see drug legalization as another left-wing cause that would erode Canada’s social fabric — and Harper’s unequivocal position no doubt reflects that thinking.

Legalization, however, does not mean condoning drug use. It means, first of all, striking the hardest blow possible against organized crime.

Isn’t that the theme of Harper’s “law and order” stance?

Second, it means taking control over a substance far too dangerous to leave in the hands of criminals. In his column, Marshall cited retired Lieut. Jack Cole of the New Jersey State Police, a former undercover officer who says drug prohibition “has given criminals the opportunity to supply drugs and to decide which ones. It’s then left to the criminal to say how they’ll be produced, how potent they’ll be, what age levels they’ll sell to and where they’re going to sell.

“If they decide to sell to 10-year-olds on our playgrounds then that’s where they’ll be sold,” Cole says.

Finally, legalization will shift drug abuse from a criminal to a clinical matter. As Marshall put it so well, “In Winnipeg, if an addict needing a fix could turn to Health Canada instead of the Hells Angels, violence and crime would plummet.”

There are also fringe benefits, including huge tax revenues that would help pay for medical services and billions of policing dollars that could be diverted into more worthwhile forms of crime fighting.

But the big reason is to hit organized crime where it hurts most — in the pocketbook.

It must be extremely difficult for veteran cops like Marshall to condemn the war against drugs. All their training, all their years on the streets go against it. But they see the big picture. They know who the good guys and bad guys are and they know who is winning the real war.

If the Conservatives want to make the kind of dent in crime that they claim to, they can no longer afford to ignore this option.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 27 2007, 09:36 AM


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Article below is online at http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2007/02...639990-sun.html.

February 17, 2007

Counterfeit cigarettes hit Manitoba
By PAUL TURENNE, SUN MEDIA

The number of contraband cigarettes flowing into Manitoba has skyrocketed in the past six months, and counterfeit smokes have found their way to our province for the first time.

Since the start of 2007, nearly 1.5 million illegally imported cigarettes have been seized in Manitoba in nine separate busts, including one this past Thursday when about 20,000 smokes were seized in two suitcases at the Greyhound bus depot downtown.

"There's been a tremendous increase in the flow into Manitoba in the past six or seven months," said David Couprie, manager of Manitoba Finance's special investigations unit. "It's like somebody just opened up the floodgates."

This year's seizures have included a Feb. 6 bust of a business on Berry Street, where nearly one million cigarettes were seized. They had been packaged in bundles of 200 in Ziploc bags and shipped in cardboard boxes.

'NO IDEA'

A 58-year-old man was taken into custody in relation to that bust, but no formal charges have been laid.

A second seizure of interest this year occurred Jan. 17 at a house in Winnipeg, where about 400 cartons of counterfeit cigarettes were found. It was the first time counterfeit smokes -- cigarettes made illegally, then packaged to look like they're legitimate -- had been seized in Manitoba.

Couprie said the counterfeit smokes are believed to have originated in China.

"We have no idea where some of this tobacco comes from. You could be smoking floor sweepings, we have no idea," he said.

Police say organized crime groups have been getting into the tobacco trafficking business lately, with Asian-based groups shipping illegally-made smokes into the country for other groups, including bikers, to distribute.

It's believed some of the flow of illegal smokes within Canada is coming from First Nations communities in the Ontario/Quebec/New York State area.

RCMP spokesman Staff Sgt. Steve Saunders said the illegal smokes -- either the counterfeit ones or the illegally made contraband ones, which look just like factory-made cigarettes but have no brand stamp on them -- are sold in places such as people's homes or out of the trunks of cars.

"It doesn't take very much word on the street to find out where you can buy these products," he said.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 27 2007, 10:04 AM


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The news wire below, sent by Canada News Wire on behalf of the Ontario Provincial Police, can be found at http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive...7/22/c3529.html.

Charges Laid in Illegal Gambling Investigation

TORONTO, Feb. 22 /CNW/ - Members of the Organized Crime Section, Illegal
Gambling Unit, with the assistance of Toronto Police Service, executed a
Criminal Code search warrant at 25-462 Birchmount Road, Toronto on February
22, 2007. As a result, the owner has been charged with illegal gambling
offences contrary to the Criminal Code of Canada.

Acting on a call from residents regarding illegal video gambling
machines, an investigation was commenced by the Illegal Gambling Unit, Toronto
Team. The investigation confirmed the existence of the machines where members
of the public, including youth, would attend to play games of chance. This
location was seeking to gain monetarily from the gambling activity.

The Organized Crime Section, Illegal Gambling Unit is in partnership
between nine police services in Ontario including Toronto, London, Niagara,
Peel, York, Windsor, Hamilton, Ottawa and the OPP. The partnership is
responsible for the investigation of province-wide illegal gambling
investigations pertaining to Part VII of the Criminal Code, with an emphasis
on Organized Crime.
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antimafia
Posted: Feb 27 2007, 01:29 PM


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News wire below can be found online at http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive...7/27/c4778.html.

Canadians Are Three Times More Likely Than Americans To Buy Counterfeit Goods, New Poll Finds
But when informed that counterfeiting finances organized crime, 86% of
Canadians would likely stop buying

TORONTO, Feb. 27 /CNW/ - A significant number of Canadians - two-fifths
of the population - acknowledge purchasing counterfeit goods, a new POLLARA
survey finds. Twenty-eight percent of respondents to the national poll
admitted knowingly purchasing counterfeit products, while 12 percent said they
found out later.

The combined figure is slightly more than triple the proportion found in
the United States by Gallup. There, just 13 percent of Americans purchased,
copied or downloaded imitation or counterfeit products.

The Canadian numbers give cause for alarm because according to the RCMP,
organized crime is a "primary actor" in Canada's multi-billion dollar market
for counterfeit products. Interpol has found that the profits from selling
counterfeit goods are being used to finance international criminal
organizations and global terrorism.

"This is a dismaying number, much higher than expected. It shows that our
government's failure to effectively address intellectual property crime has
led to wide-spread acceptance of product counterfeiting in Canada," said Brian
Isaac, Chair of the Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network (CACN) Legislation
Committee, and a partner with Smart & Biggar, Canada's largest IP law
boutique.

However, the poll, conducted by POLLARA on behalf of the CACN, a
non-profit coalition united in the fight against counterfeiting and piracy,
also revealed that, when Canadians are informed that proceeds of the
counterfeit market go to organized crime, the vast majority (86 percent) would
be less likely to buy counterfeit products.

"If there is a silver lining here, it is the evidence that Canadians will
refrain from buying counterfeit goods when they know about the involvement of
organized crime," said Lorne Lipkus, Chair of the CACN Education and Training
Committee and a partner with Kestenberg Siegal Lipkus LLP, a leading
anti-counterfeiting law firm. "This tells us that, if we pass the right laws,
empower our police forces, and educate our citizens, then we can solve this
problem."

The study also found that 90 percent of Canadians completely or somewhat
agree that people are more likely to buy or sell counterfeits because there is
little chance of being caught. Duncan McKie, Vice Chair, POLLARA remarked,
"Given widespread awareness that the legal consequences for counterfeiting in
Canada are minimal, people will continue buying and selling counterfeit goods.
This creates an ongoing economic risk. When so many Canadians knowingly buy
knockoffs instead of legitimate products, significant economic fallout is
inevitable."

Another surprising poll finding was the low awareness by Canadians of the
counterfeiting of everyday items. Just 19 percent of respondents were aware
that extension cords are counterfeited, 30 percent were aware that batteries
are counterfeited and 49 percent were aware that drugs and other medicines are
counterfeited.

"Counterfeit products are generally inferior and raise significant health
and safety risks to consumers. The lack of knowledge of counterfeiting of
products that pose fire, explosion or direct health risks increases the extent
to which such products put Canadians at risk," said Doug Geralde, Chair of
CACN and a director at CSA (Canadian Standards Association) International.

The survey also found that purchases of counterfeit goods displace
legitimate commerce. About half of those who bought counterfeit movies, music
or software would have purchased the genuine version had they not purchased a
copy (for movies, the figure was 45 percent; music, 43 percent; and software,
44 percent).

"This indicates a troubling and significant economic cost," Carol Osmond,
vice chair of CACN and senior policy advisor to the Canadian Association of
Importers and Exporter said. "But there is also good news in this for Canada's
economy," added Osmond, noting that reduced counterfeiting would boost sales
of legitimate products and spur innovation and investment as entrepreneurs
grow more confident that their creative products and ideas would not be
pirated.

<<
Additional Survey Highlights

- 70 percent of respondents favour heavy fines as a deterrent to
counterfeiting; 43 percent favour jail time; and just 4 percent would
"leave things as they are."

- Canadians are aware that the odds of getting caught or prosecuted for
selling counterfeit goods in Canada are low. About 68 percent of
respondents agreed that sellers "almost never" or "seldom" get
caught. Only 1 percent believes they are "often" caught.

- 90 percent of Canadians believe people are more likely to buy or sell
counterfeit goods because there is little chance of being caught.

- Of the respondents who have purchased counterfeit goods, the most
common items were clothing (41 percent), watches (28 percent),
sunglasses (25 percent), handbags/purses (21 percent), movies
(20 percent) and computer software (17 percent).

- 55 percent describe the quality of the counterfeit goods they
purchased as "a lot poorer than the genuine;" 34 percent said the
quality is the same; and less than 1 percent said it is "a lot
better."
>>

Survey Methodology

The POLLARA Online Poll is based on a Feb. 16-20, 2007 survey of 2,034
online households, selected at random from the Canadian online population.
Currently, POLLARA estimates that 70 percent of Canadians have access to the
Internet. Respondents are selected based on their participation in POLLARA
national surveys conducted by telephone. The poll has an estimated sampling
error of plus or minus 2.2 percent in 19 out of 25 cases. The complete survey
results are available at www.cacn.ca.

About CACN

The Canadian Anti-Counterfeiting Network (CACN) is a non-profit coalition
of stakeholders that have united in the fight against product counterfeiting
and copyright piracy in Canada and internationally. Members include
broad-based organizations and companies from a range of industries as well as
law firms representing intellectual property rights holders. CACN's mission is
to significantly reduce and ultimately eliminate the manufacture, importation,
distribution and sale of counterfeit products in Canada and abroad through
public education, training of law enforcement, and lobbying for legislative
change and increased resources. CACN can be found online at www.cacn.ca.
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presley1000
Posted: Feb 28 2007, 10:19 AM


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Original article at http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/186401


Stock scam linked to organized crime

Court documents allege Markham man is key in the Cosimo Commisso family and is tied to a pump-and-dump fraud

Feb 28, 2007 04:30 AM
Tony Van Alphen
Nick Pron
Staff Reporters

Friends know him as the soft-spoken owner of a popular garden centre north of Toronto, a family man who financially supports minor hockey teams.

But in court documents obtained by the Toronto Star, the RCMP alleges Aneillo (Neil) Peluso is a key member of the Cosimo Commisso organized crime family and a major player in a multi-million-dollar Bay Street "pump-and-dump" stock fraud.

Last September, Canada's national police force charged Peluso – a tall, 47-year-old businessman with no criminal record – and two other men, with conspiring to manipulate the share price of a junior company and turn it from a penny stock into a must-have investment.

Its only real asset was a stake in a flooded mine in Northern Ontario.

The Mounties allege the scheme at Pender International could have netted players more than $360 million, but regulators stopped all trading among a group of related companies responsible for most of the action in late 2004.

Peluso's lawyer, Alan Gold, said last night that the allegations in RCMP affidavits about his client's ties to an organized crime family are worthless.

"They're not worth the search warrant paper they're written on," he said in an interview.

Gold added allegations in such affidavits and publication of them are unfortunately the price of freedom of the press.

He also said the fraud charges against Peluso in the Pender case are before the courts and his client will vigorously defend against them.

While detectives originally focused on members of "Italian-based traditional organized crime," according to the documents used to obtain search warrants, the investigation later mushroomed into a number of other areas that made headlines across the country.

In one case, a senior Toronto prosecutor resigned when he got caught up in a sting operation that ended with a prominent lawyer going to jail for money-laundering. Then there was a series of corruption charges laid against officers with the Toronto police over allegations they were extorting from bar owners in the entertainment district. Other officers faced disciplinary charges for their involvement with a used-car dealer, but when one was exonerated, he sued the force for allegedly smearing his name through leaks to the media.

Detectives also uncovered what they described as another Bay Street fraud, and are awaiting, according to the heavily edited documents, "the laying of charges."

It was expected that most of the cases, the main investigation and the offshoot probes, will be before the courts for years, all covered by traditional publication bans. But the unsealed documents used by investigators with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit are open to public scrutiny, offering a rare glimpse into this city's organized crime underworld.

A potential witness in the Pender fraud case is terrified for his life, a court heard yesterday, and is asking that he be identified only as X, Y and Z. A hearing date has yet to be set on his request.

After getting a judge's approval for search warrants and wiretaps, detectives quietly began their investigation in April 2001, based out of a secret office in the north end of the city.

At the time of the charges, the RCMP did not disclose any details publicly about Peluso's background.

His alleged involvement in Pender became apparent during an investigation called Project Ora, which targeted Commisso and "his group" for their involvement in "criminal offences" and other alleged crimes, which were blacked out on the documents.

In the documents, Commisso was described as one of the heads of the "Italian-based organized crime group."

One affidavit described Peluso as "a high ranking member of Cosimo Commisso's organized crime group."

A footnote in the same police affidavit also disclosed that the special enforcement unit had been targeting "Commisso and his associates such as Neil Peluso for their alleged involvement" in criminal offences. Details of that activity are blacked out.

The affidavits are only allegations of wrongdoing by the police and have not been proven in court.

The RCMP says the charges in the separate Pender probe against Peluso represent one of the rare occasions where police have arrested an alleged top mobster for stock fraud in the half-century since organized crime groups began infiltrating stock markets.

Ontario government corporate records show Peluso owns Tree Valley Garden Centre, with operations in Stouffville and Richmond Hill. The government information and RCMP do not make any allegations against the company.

Peluso lives in a large home inside a gated enclave next to a golf course in nearby King City. Acquaintances describe him as unassuming and friendly. His garden centre has supported community activities, including the sponsorship of minor hockey teams.

Although Peluso has no criminal record, the RCMP affidavit said he experienced at least one brush with the law several years ago.

York regional police charged him with four counts of assault, including two with a weapon. But the Crown dropped the charges in 2002.

Among the criminal counts in the Pender case, the RCMP charged Peluso with assault causing bodily harm and robbing a businessman.

Furthermore, the RCMP said Peluso and his alleged partners, Michael Lee Mitton and Michael Ciavarella, used accusations, threats or violence in efforts to induce a Pender public relations officer to do "one or more things" relating to the company for their own financial gain.

The force did not provide any further details about the alleged extortion, robbery and assault.

In the allegations, the RCMP charged the trio with fraud over $5,000 and conspiracy to commit fraud in connection with manipulating the public market price of Pender in Canada, the U.S. and elsewhere between May 2004 and July 2005.

Police say individuals in the case artificially boosted Pender's stock through phoney promotion and trading among related companies and then sold shares at a profit before investors discovered they had been duped.

Ciavarella, 44, and Mitton, 48, also face money-laundering charges. Police allege they possessed $243,991.39 (U.S.) with knowledge that some or all of it was obtained directly or indirectly from crime.

Police declined to elaborate on how they calculated the amount of the alleged $360 million fraud but some brokerages lost money.

For example, HSBC Securities claimed in a lawsuit it advanced funds to the trading account of one company with ties to Pender and found itself short $2.6 million (U.S.) when cheques for stock didn't clear. HSBC said it also issued loans of about $900,000 to parties with possible links to the alleged fraud.

Peluso and Ciavarella, a former Pender president, are free on bail with restrictions. In Peluso's case, three relatives, including his wife and father, pledged $1.2 million (Canadian) in sureties to ensure he was freed on bail.

As conditions of his release, the court ordered Peluso to surrender any guns, resign from senior corporate positions and refrain from contact with more than 84 specific individuals who could be witnesses in the case.

One unsealed affidavit describes a phone call between Peluso and Ciavarella in which they discuss issuing press releases to explain Pender's meteroic rise on the stock markets, worrying that the public might not believe that a penny stock worth 10 cents one day went up "all of a sudden" to $5 a share.

Mitton eluded police for nearly four months after they charged him. They finally took him into custody last month in downtown Toronto.

He remains in custody, but is no stranger to jail after racking up more than 100 criminal convictions during his career, primarily relating to stock market frauds in British Columbia.

The short, portly built man has been described by a judge as a "professional swindler." The B.C. Securities Commission called him a "classic financial predator." Securities regulators in B.C. and Alberta have imposed permanent trading bans on him in recent years.

He owes more than $425,000 in fines and penalties to the B.C. commission and several million dollars in restitution orders to brokerages and investors.

Before heading to B.C. in the mid-1980s, Mitton had spent time in prison on several fraud convictions in Montreal.

He was out on parole again when the Ontario Securities Commission found suspicious trading at Pender in late 2004.

Pender, which traded on the electronic NASD over-the- counter board, originally started as a furniture importer in 1998 but later turned itself into a "merchant bank."

Pender's share price shot up from 30 cents (U.S.) on Oct.14, 2004, to $11.35 within 35 trading days despite no significant corporate developments. The company's only tangible asset was an indirect stake in a flooded mine in Northern Ontario.

The commission halted trading in Pender stock by Mitton, Ciavarella and related companies in December 2004 and the RCMP's Integrated Market Enforcement Team stepped in. The RCMP team began a probe and executed more than a dozen search warrants on banks, brokerages, phone companies and Mitton's penthouse in Markham over the past two years.

Another police affidavit said the penthouse had the same address as one of the companies that traded heavily in Pender stock.

After the Ontario Securities Commission halted trading by companies in the alleged fraud, phone records showed numerous phone calls between Mitton and Peluso, the documents said.

Another RCMP affidavit said HSBC Securities indicated it appeared Ciavarella, the head of Pender, purchased and sold its shares between related accounts at different brokerages.

Meanwhile, investigations that arose from the original project remain before the courts.

One case involves allegations of corruption against two Toronto police officers accused of shaking down bar owners in the entertainment district. A second case involving a used-car dealer ended up with several Toronto officers charged internally under the Police Services Act.

One of them, Robert Correa, eventually exonerated at a police tribunal, later sued the force, alleging that officers with internal affairs, along with then-chief Julian Fantino, deliberately fed misinformation to the media to discredit him. Those allegations, hotly denied, have not been tested in court.

Another probe, called project "OJUST," ended with prominent lawyer Peter Shoniker pleading guilty to money-laundering. A judge sentenced him to 15 months in jail.

A senior Toronto prosecutor quietly resigned from the Crown attorney's office after police disclosed his role in the case – directing an undercover officer with stolen union funds to speak to Shoniker.
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presley1000
Posted: Mar 10 2007, 12:42 PM


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original National Post story

Alleged parole violations lead to mobster's arrest
Angelo Musitano: Associated with known criminals, police say

Adrian Humphreys
National Post

Friday, March 09, 2007

Angelo Musitano, released from prison in October after serving six years for ordering the death of a rival Mafia boss, has been arrested again by Hamilton police -- for associating with known criminals, police say.

Musitano, 29, the youngest son of a deceased Mafia don, was arrested without incident on Wednesday afternoon after police stopped the car he was driving along Hamilton's Lawrence Road. He was arrested on a parole suspension warrant.

"Mr. Musitano had very strict conditions to abide by upon his release, which he allegedly breached," said Acting Inspector Ted Davis, officer in charge of the Golden Horseshoe Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, a special anti-mob task force.

The arrest warrant was issued after police alleged several breaches of his parole conditions that stipulate he is not to associate with any person involved in criminal activity or to have contact with his oldest brother, Pasquale "Pat" Musitano, without prior permission.

Pat Musitano took over the reins of what they call the Musitano Crime Family after the 1995 death of their father, Dominic, according to a police report written on the brothers for prison officials.

Both Angelo and Pat Musitano pleaded guilty in 2000 to ordering the murder of Carmen Barillaro, a Niagara Falls crime boss who was killed during underworld uncertainty that followed the 1997 murder of the longreigning Mafia boss in Ontario, John "Johnny Pops" Papalia.

Papalia was dubbed "The Enforcer" because of the iron grip he held on organized crime.

The Musitano brothers were each sentenced to 10 years in prison.

At the time of their release, Brian Mullan, Hamilton's Chief of Police, promised that his officers would keep a close watch over them.

Angelo Musitano's alleged parole violation does not involve contacting his brother, but rather other criminal elements in Hamilton and the surrounding area.

An "indirect" connection to a recent rash of violence relating to illicit gambling machines is also being investigated as a contributing factor, according to a police source.

Dean Paquette, who is the lawyer representing Musitano, said his client has not been given details of his arrest and no mention has been made of additional criminal activity.

"Mr. Musitano has no idea of who he is alleged to have associated with. I am trying to find out," Mr. Paquette said.

Correctional Service Canada has up to 30 days to investigate the allegations and to either rerelease Musitano or to turn his case over to the National Parole Board to decide whether he should be re-imprisoned to serve more of his remaining sentence.

Ahumphreys@nationalpost.com
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presley1000
Posted: Apr 2 2007, 01:19 PM


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CBC's The Fifth Estate recently aired a program about various Canadian underworld characters including Vito Rizzuto. It's available for viewing online...

Crime Pays
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presley1000
Posted: Apr 4 2007, 01:08 PM


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Sat, March 31, 2007

Gangster gun peddler jailed
By SAM PAZZANO, SUN MEDIA

TORONTO -- The wife of a notorious mobster was sentenced to three and a half years in prison yesterday for selling guns to an undercover cop who told her the weapons would be sold to the Native Syndicate street gang in Winnipeg.

SUBMACHINE-GUNS

Ingeborg Anna Richter, 62, was convicted in a Toronto courtroom Jan. 30 with 30 counts of firearms trafficking after she and her husband, mobster Chuck Yanover, sold First and Second World War-era guns to an undercover cop posing as a biker.

Police officer Andrew Johnson met the couple at a gun show in 2002 and bought deactivated Sten submachine-guns and parts from them.

Ontario Crown prosecutor David Mitchell said Johnson told the pair he would sell the guns to the Native Syndicate, a street gang that operates in Winnipeg's North End, in Manitoba jails, and in other parts of the province.


Court heard wiretap evidence suggesting Richter cared little about her guns being used for possible gang warfare.

"You make a buck, I make a buck, who cares what happens afterwards," she was overheard telling Johnson.

Mitchell had asked the court to impose a five to seven-year prison term. Her defence lawyer had suggested 20 months.

Yanover, meanwhile, is already serving the equivalent of a 10-year sentence for his role.

The 61-year-old is a former enforcer for murdered mob boss Paul Volpe, and also spent time in prison for a plot to overthrow the government of Dominica and install a white supremacist regime, as well as a scheme to assassinate the president of South Korea in the 1980s.
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beemoe
Posted: Apr 4 2007, 05:43 PM


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I finally found "The Sixth Family" it`s an interesting book but omits some interesting characters like Willie Obront. There`s only a few sentences concerning his relationship with the Rizzuto Family. No real details on Obront.
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Laurentian
Posted: Apr 7 2007, 10:57 AM


Tony Accardo
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del

This post has been edited by Laurentian on May 7 2008, 08:03 AM
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x-man
Posted: Apr 7 2007, 01:56 PM


The old wiseguy
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Laurentian- do you have this article in english?
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GangstersInc
Posted: Apr 7 2007, 02:05 PM


David the webmaster
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QUOTE (x-man @ Apr 7 2007, 08:56 PM)
Laurentian- do you have this article in english?

You can try this online translator:
http://babelfish.altavista.com/


--------------------
Check out the Gangsters Inc website for all your news and info about organized crime and the mafia!
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x-man
Posted: Apr 7 2007, 04:04 PM


The old wiseguy
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thanks!
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Laurentian
Posted: Apr 7 2007, 04:43 PM


Tony Accardo
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del

This post has been edited by Laurentian on May 7 2008, 08:04 AM
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GangstersInc
Posted: Apr 13 2007, 09:10 AM


David the webmaster
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Mobster jailed in Russo case stabbed
Fellow inmate charged in what source calls a 'hit' on Peter Scarcella
Apr 12, 2007 04:30 AM
Peter Edwards
staff reporter

Mobster Peter Scarcella is in protective custody in Millhaven maximum-security penitentiary after being stabbed repeatedly during an attack in the prison's laundry room.

"It was a (attempted) hit," said a source who is very familiar with Scarcella.

Scarcella, 56, is serving an 11-year-sentence for his role in two botched gangland hits on April 21, 2004, at a North York sandwich shop that left bystander Louise Russo paralyzed.

Russo, a mother of three teenagers, has had to use a wheelchair since the drive-by shooting.

In the April 1 attack on Scarcella, he was stabbed a half-dozen times in the upper body by a fellow inmate, who covered his face, while another inmate in the laundry room fled.

Millhaven inmate Andrew Carpenter, 23, is to appear in court in Kingston on May 2, charged with assault with a weapon.

Scarcella, formerly of Vaughan, had been bodyguard to former Toronto Mob boss Paul Volpe, who was found dead in the trunk of his wife's BMW at Pearson International Airport in 1983.

Scarcella, who in the 1980s survived an underworld attempt on his life, recently fell into disfavour with mobsters and the Hells Angels after the botched attack that paralyzed Russo, the source said. The source added that Scarcella is particularly wary of another mobster, with a tight association to the Rizzuto crime family, who is also in prison, serving time for attempted murder.

That other mobster is listed on Scarcella's "incompatible" list in prison, so authorities don't put them together.

Scarcella passed out in a pool of his own blood after the 10:30 p.m. attack at the prison in Bath, outside Kingston, and was treated in Kingston General Hospital. He was transferred back to Millhaven Penitentiary this week, after his condition stabilized. He has been kept away from other prisoners.


--------------------
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antimafia
Posted: Apr 13 2007, 11:14 AM


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QUOTE (GangstersInc @ Apr 13 2007, 09:10 AM)
Mobster jailed in Russo case stabbed
Fellow inmate charged in what source calls a 'hit' on Peter Scarcella
Apr 12, 2007 04:30 AM
Peter Edwards
staff reporter

Mobster Peter Scarcella is in protective custody in Millhaven maximum-security penitentiary after being stabbed repeatedly during an attack in the prison's laundry room.

"It was a (attempted) hit," said a source who is very familiar with Scarcella.

Scarcella, 56, is serving an 11-year-sentence for his role in two botched gangland hits on April 21, 2004, at a North York sandwich shop that left bystander Louise Russo paralyzed.

Russo, a mother of three teenagers, has had to use a wheelchair since the drive-by shooting.

In the April 1 attack on Scarcella, he was stabbed a half-dozen times in the upper body by a fellow inmate, who covered his face, while another inmate in the laundry room fled.

Millhaven inmate Andrew Carpenter, 23, is to appear in court in Kingston on May 2, charged with assault with a weapon.

Scarcella, formerly of Vaughan, had been bodyguard to former Toronto Mob boss Paul Volpe, who was found dead in the trunk of his wife's BMW at Pearson International Airport in 1983.

Scarcella, who in the 1980s survived an underworld attempt on his life, recently fell into disfavour with mobsters and the Hells Angels after the botched attack that paralyzed Russo, the source said. The source added that Scarcella is particularly wary of another mobster, with a tight association to the Rizzuto crime family, who is also in prison, serving time for attempted murder.

That other mobster is listed on Scarcella's "incompatible" list in prison, so authorities don't put them together.

Scarcella passed out in a pool of his own blood after the 10:30 p.m. attack at the prison in Bath, outside Kingston, and was treated in Kingston General Hospital. He was transferred back to Millhaven Penitentiary this week, after his condition stabilized. He has been kept away from other prisoners.


Below are links to two other articles, as well as parts of the articles themselves.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/sto...PStory/National
Prison stabbing called mob vendetta
TIMOTHY APPLEBY

Apr 13/07

The penitentiary stabbing of a top Toronto mobster serving a lengthy sentence for his role in the botched underworld shooting of bystander Louise Russo three years ago likely stems from the betrayal of the gang by a close associate, an organized-crime expert suggested yesterday.

Alternatively, Peter Scarcella may have been attacked by fellow inmates anxious to make a name for themselves, said a former detective who helped crack the Russo case.

Either way, Mr. Scarcella is in a segregation wing of Millhaven penitentiary, near Kingston, recovering from half a dozen knife wounds inflicted on him this month in the laundry room of the adjacent Bath Institution.

A former bodyguard for Toronto gangland boss Paul Volpe, whose body was found stuffed in the trunk of his wife's BMW in 1983, Mr. Scarcella is serving an 11-year term for the wounding of Ms. Russo, a 45-year-old mother of three left paralyzed for life after being shot in the back as she stood in line at a North York sandwich shop.

The police case hinged on the collaboration of gang member Raffaele Delle Donne, 39, who gave up four associates in exchange for leniency -- a deal he described as an act of conscience because of what happened to Ms. Russo. The target of the abortive shooting was visiting Sicilian gangster Michele Modica, a rival to Mr. Scarcella.

Security consultant Antonio Nicaso, author of 13 books on organized crime, says he is hearing on the street that Mr. Scarcella, 56, was stabbed by two assailants because of his links to Mr. Delle Donne....

_________________________

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Features/2007/...003207-sun.html
April 13, 2007

Mobster target of hit?
Prison stabbing may have been retribution for bringing in police informant


By ROB LAMBERTI -- Sun Media

Police are investigating the possibility that a powerful Toronto-area mob leader, serving time in Millhaven for the botched hit that injured Louise Russo, was himself the target of a failed hit.

Police are also considering that the April 1 stabbing of Pietro Scarcella by an inmate was possibly staged to get him out of prison, according to a source.

Scarcella, of Vaughan, is serving nine years for his role in the botched hit which permanently paralysed innocent bystander Russo in April 2004. He was stabbed in the upper body and leg in the laundry area of the maximum-security penitentiary.

Another inmate, Andrew Carpenter, 23, is charged with assault with a weapon and is to appear in Kingston court May 2.

The source said the suspect is not connected with any crime group, and is considered a street-crime type of criminal....

This post has been edited by antimafia on Apr 13 2007, 11:26 AM
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Laurentian
Posted: May 19 2007, 05:39 AM


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Laurentian
Posted: May 20 2007, 06:57 AM


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del

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Hollander
Posted: May 21 2007, 04:53 AM


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Druglord released on parole
The Gazette
Published: Monday, May 21, 2007
One of three brothers who headed a major international drug-trafficking ring with Mafia ties is expected to return to Montreal after being granted day parole.

As part of his release, Gerlando Caruana, 63, will have to report to a halfway house north of Montreal. He is currently serving a combined sentence of nearly 31 years at a medium-security institution near Kingston, Ont.

On July 15, 1998, Caruana was arrested in Montreal while at the same time his brothers Alphonso and Pasquale were being rounded up in Toronto. They were among more than a dozen people arrested as a special police unit ended Project Omerta, a lengthy investigation into the Caruana brothers' drug trafficking.

The brothers, in particular Alphonso, have long been described as the heads of one of the largest organized crime families in the world.

Pasquale Caruana was paroled in 2003 and Alphonso is being held in custody while he continues to challenge an extradition request from Italy.

When he was arrested nine years ago, Gerlando Caruana was on parole while serving a 20-year sentence he had received on March 7, 1986.

He had been linked to a $55-million shipment of heroin that was stored at a warehouse in St. Laurent. The 18-year sentence Gerlando Caruana received in 2000 - after pleading guilty to conspiracy to import and traffic in cocaine - was combined with his previous sentence.
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Posted: May 22 2007, 01:47 AM


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Border guards find $5.2 million in Ecstasy in truck
By BRAD WONG
P-I REPORTER

U.S. border guards uncovered more than $5.2 million worth of Ecstasy inside a container truck's doors Friday, marking one of the largest Northwest drug discoveries of its kind in recent years, a federal spokesman said.

The discovery of 182 pounds of the drug occurred at the border crossing on U.S. Route 97 near Oroville, said Mike Milne, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokesman.

Officials scanned the 18-wheel truck, which was heading to California, with X-ray technology and noticed "shading" in the tail doors, he said. They found 49 packages of the drug -- about 262,000 pills -- inside.

The Canadian truck drivers, a man and woman, were released, and U.S. officials had yet to arrest anyone. Investigators were trying to determine who owns the trailer and who packed it, Milne said.

In the past three or four years, smugglers have been trying to ship Ecstasy through the U.S.-Canadian border because it is more compact than "B.C. Bud," or marijuana, Milne said.

"It's more bang for the smuggling buck," he said.

The truck was hauling what was listed on its manifest -- wooden-pallet-making materials.

In recent years, that section of the border with Canada has seen smugglers attempt to sneak in marijuana, Ecstasy and illegal immigrants, including Korean nationals, he said.

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antimafia
Posted: May 28 2007, 09:58 AM


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QUOTE (antimafia @ Apr 13 2007, 11:14 AM)
QUOTE (GangstersInc @ Apr 13 2007, 09:10 AM)
Mobster jailed in Russo case stabbed
Fellow inmate charged in what source calls a 'hit' on Peter Scarcella
Apr 12, 2007 04:30 AM
Peter Edwards
staff reporter

Mobster Peter Scarcella is in protective custody in Millhaven maximum-security penitentiary after being stabbed repeatedly during an attack in the prison's laundry room.

"It was a (attempted) hit," said a source who is very familiar with Scarcella.

Scarcella, 56, is serving an 11-year-sentence for his role in two botched gangland hits on April 21, 2004, at a North York sandwich shop that left bystander Louise Russo paralyzed.

Russo, a mother of three teenagers, has had to use a wheelchair since the drive-by shooting.

In the April 1 attack on Scarcella, he was stabbed a half-dozen times in the upper body by a fellow inmate, who covered his face, while another inmate in the laundry room fled.

Millhaven inmate Andrew Carpenter, 23, is to appear in court in Kingston on May 2, charged with assault with a weapon.

Scarcella, formerly of Vaughan, had been bodyguard to former Toronto Mob boss Paul Volpe, who was found dead in the trunk of his wife's BMW at Pearson International Airport in 1983.

Scarcella, who in the 1980s survived an underworld attempt on his life, recently fell into disfavour with mobsters and the Hells Angels after the botched attack that paralyzed Russo, the source said. The source added that Scarcella is particularly wary of another mobster, with a tight association to the Rizzuto crime family, who is also in prison, serving time for attempted murder.

That other mobster is listed on Scarcella's "incompatible" list in prison, so authorities don't put them together.

Scarcella passed out in a pool of his own blood after the 10:30 p.m. attack at the prison in Bath, outside Kingston, and was treated in Kingston General Hospital. He was transferred back to Millhaven Penitentiary this week, after his condition stabilized. He has been kept away from other prisoners.


Below are links to two other articles, as well as parts of the articles themselves.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/sto...PStory/National
Prison stabbing called mob vendetta
TIMOTHY APPLEBY

Apr 13/07

The penitentiary stabbing of a top Toronto mobster serving a lengthy sentence for his role in the botched underworld shooting of bystander Louise Russo three years ago likely stems from the betrayal of the gang by a close associate, an organized-crime expert suggested yesterday.

Alternatively, Peter Scarcella may have been attacked by fellow inmates anxious to make a name for themselves, said a former detective who helped crack the Russo case.

Either way, Mr. Scarcella is in a segregation wing of Millhaven penitentiary, near Kingston, recovering from half a dozen knife wounds inflicted on him this month in the laundry room of the adjacent Bath Institution.

A former bodyguard for Toronto gangland boss Paul Volpe, whose body was found stuffed in the trunk of his wife's BMW in 1983, Mr. Scarcella is serving an 11-year term for the wounding of Ms. Russo, a 45-year-old mother of three left paralyzed for life after being shot in the back as she stood in line at a North York sandwich shop.

The police case hinged on the collaboration of gang member Raffaele Delle Donne, 39, who gave up four associates in exchange for leniency -- a deal he described as an act of conscience because of what happened to Ms. Russo. The target of the abortive shooting was visiting Sicilian gangster Michele Modica, a rival to Mr. Scarcella.

Security consultant Antonio Nicaso, author of 13 books on organized crime, says he is hearing on the street that Mr. Scarcella, 56, was stabbed by two assailants because of his links to Mr. Delle Donne....

_________________________

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Features/2007/...003207-sun.html
April 13, 2007

Mobster target of hit?
Prison stabbing may have been retribution for bringing in police informant


By ROB LAMBERTI -- Sun Media

Police are investigating the possibility that a powerful Toronto-area mob leader, serving time in Millhaven for the botched hit that injured Louise Russo, was himself the target of a failed hit.

Police are also considering that the April 1 stabbing of Pietro Scarcella by an inmate was possibly staged to get him out of prison, according to a source.

Scarcella, of Vaughan, is serving nine years for his role in the botched hit which permanently paralysed innocent bystander Russo in April 2004. He was stabbed in the upper body and leg in the laundry area of the maximum-security penitentiary.

Another inmate, Andrew Carpenter, 23, is charged with assault with a weapon and is to appear in Kingston court May 2.

The source said the suspect is not connected with any crime group, and is considered a street-crime type of criminal....

An article from last week that could easily have been overlooked -- about a crooked Toronto police officer who stole money from police funds and conducted surveillance on individuals without orders -- states the following:

A number of his [Det. Garry Carter's] criminal cases fell apart when he mysteriously left the force in 1995, including the most important one — the case he had spent years building against mob boss Peter Scarcella.

In a tragic twist, Scarcella was charged years later in connection with a failed mob hit that left innocent bystander Louise Russo paralyzed in a shooting at a Toronto sandwich shop.

She was struck by a bullet meant for Scarcella's organized crime associates. Scarcella was charged with two counts of conspiracy to commit murder.


The above text is the only mention in the article of Scarcella. The link to the article is http://www.cbc.ca/canada/toronto/story/200...nce-report.html.
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Laurentian
Posted: Jun 3 2007, 10:43 AM


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antimafia
Posted: Jun 6 2007, 07:23 AM


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QUOTE (Laurentian @ Oct 5 2006, 06:53 AM)
Musitano brothers deflected blame

Sought to distance themselves from execution-style killing of Papalia: crime expert

By Barbara Brown
The Hamilton Spectator, October 4, 2006

Pat Musitano's decision in February 2000 to plead guilty to conspiring to murder a Niagara Falls man was fascinating for a couple of reasons.

First, Musitano was not charged with plotting to kill Carmen Barillaro, 53, before striking the plea deal with the Hamilton Crown's office. He was charged with the first-degree murder of Mafia boss John Papalia, 73, but not Papalia's Niagara lieutenant, Barillaro.

At the time, lawyer Dean Paquette said Pat Musitano was giving up his right to a trial by judge and jury in order to grab a plea bargain for his youngest brother, Angelo, then 22.

Angelo was facing two counts of murder in the gun slayings of Barillaro and Papalia.

Second, the admitted killers were determined to distance themselves from the execution-style killing of Papalia, known as Johnny Pops to friends and The Enforcer to mobster cronies.

The agreement was that the Crown would withdraw both murder counts relating to Papalia and the Musitanos would take responsibility for Barillaro alone.

Outside the courtroom, Toronto lawyer John Rosen was clear about the message the brothers wanted to come from the courtroom.

"The withdrawal of the (murder) charges is a clear indication that neither Angelo nor Pat Musitano had anything to do with the death of John Papalia," said Rosen.

Canadian organized crime expert Antonio Nicaso said it was hardly surprising the Musitanos would admit to killing Barillaro but deflect blame for the murder of Papalia.

"The Papalia family, of course, carried a lot of power and had many connections to organized crime."

The son of Antonio Papalia, a bootlegger in the era of Rocco Perri, was one of the oldest active members of the Magaddino La Cosa Nostra family.

Barillaro, on the other hand, came from a family of law-abiding citizens.

Nicaso said whoever ordered Papalia killed would have done so only with the support of someone powerful at his back.

Still, the Musitanos' professed motive for killing Barillaro stemmed from the May 31, 1997, murder of Papalia.

Two days later, police surveillance cameras picked up Pat Musitano and Barillaro talking near the Gathering Spot, the former James Street North eatery owned by the Musitanos.

Police tried to intercept the intense conversation, with limited success. Barillaro accused Musitano of ordering the hit on Papalia. Musitano denied any involvement.

Barillaro would not be dissuaded. He had information that a close Musitano associate, Ken Murdock, had been the triggerman.

Murdock pleaded guilty Nov. 24, 1998 to shooting both Papalia and Barillaro. He is serving a life sentence.

Rosen claimed that Murdock killed Papalia for his own reasons, which would have come out had there been a trial.

Barillaro was "absolutely mistaken," said Rosen, but "he was bound, bent and determined to avenge his friend."

The defence team said their clients decided on a pre-emptive strike and took out Barillaro before he could seek his revenge.

bbrown@thespec.com

Link to article related to Laurentian's post above, as well as part of the article itself, appears below:

http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/st...8510849ad61&k=0

Mob boss's son allowed to remain free
Release violations not proven, board concludes

Adrian Humphreys
National Post

Tuesday, June 05, 2007

The son of a notorious Mafia boss, who followed into the family business, has been released from prison despite police concern he unleashed a fresh round of extortion and violence shortly after release less than a year ago.

When Angelo Musitano, 30, of Hamilton, was released in October after serving six years of a 10-year sentence for ordering the death of a rival mob boss, Hamilton's chief of police promised he would be closely monitored.

Musitano's statutory release came with special conditions on where he could not go, what he could not do and whom he could not speak with. In fact, when he first met with his parole supervisor in Hamilton, he was handed a list of people to avoid.

Five months later, Hamilton police accused him of violating each of those conditions....
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antimafia
Posted: Jun 7 2007, 05:03 PM


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Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) Eyeing Montreal to Operate In

Link to article about this topic, along with part of the article itself, appears below:

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news...14c3e32&k=27380

Violent international crime gang eyes Montreal
Paul Cherry
The Gazette

Thursday, June 07, 2007

Members of an international gang notorious for its use of extreme violence appear to be interested in setting up shop in Montreal.

Membership in Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-13, a gang whose members are mostly Salvadorans or from other Central American countries, has grown at an alarming rate in the U.S. The gang is already established in Vancouver and has reportedly tried to set up a base in Toronto.

In an interview today with The Gazette, Inspector Giovanni Di Feo, head of the Montreal police organized crime division, said two members of the gang recently tried to enter Canada, destined for Montreal, but were quickly arrested. One has been deported and the other awaits possible expulsion.

A third gang member is known to be in the city, however, but is being closely monitored by police, Di Feo said. Officials hope to deport that person.

Mara Salvatrucha members in eastern U.S. cities have used machetes to hack off the limbs of their rivals. In Honduras, the gang was linked to an attack on a bus in 2004 in which 28 people, including six children, were killed by attackers using automatic weapons....
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antimafia
Posted: Jun 11 2007, 02:00 PM


Toto Riina
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Alfonso Caruana of Caruana-Cuntrera Clan Continutes Fighting Extradition to Italy

Link to article about Alfonso Caruana, as well as part of the article itself, appears below.

http://www.thestar.com/News/article/223459

Man doing time fights extradition to Italian jail
June 09, 2007
Peter Edwards Staff Reporter

Italian authorities didn't know convicted Mafia fugitive Alfonso Caruana was living in the Greater Toronto Area until he was photographed by RCMP surveillance officers at a posh wedding reception at the downtown Sutton Place Hotel, where he was father of the bride, an Appeal Court in Toronto heard.

Caruana is appealing a 2000 extradition order to return him to his birthplace after he completes an 18-year sentence in Canada for plotting to import 2,300 kilograms of cocaine from Colombia.

Caruana was sentenced in absentia in Palermo in 1997 to 20 years in prison for Mafia association, drug trafficking and money-laundering....
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Laurentian
Posted: Jun 13 2007, 06:18 AM


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Laurentian
Posted: Jun 23 2007, 06:45 AM


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antimafia
Posted: Jul 12 2007, 11:53 AM


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Frank Cotroni, US Mobsters, Plotted to Kill Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren Burger

Link to the article, as well as part of the article itself, appears below:

http://www.canada.com/topics/news/national...0c1795e&k=47327

FBI linked Montreal mobster to alleged U.S. assassination plot
Paul Cherry
CanWest News Service

Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Montreal mob boss Frank Cotroni and high-ranking U.S. mobsters were once investigated for an alleged plot to assassinate the top judge in America, according to newly released FBI documents.

The investigation into the alleged plot to assassinate Chief Justice Warren Burger began in December 1981, after an informant came forward with information of a jailhouse plot. It ended 15 months later with no charges being laid. Instead, the FBI dispatched agents to warn the heads of Mafia families in the U.S. that any attempt to assassinate Burger "would be responded to with the full force and resources of the (Department) of Justice and the FBI."

The documents were obtained by the Montreal Gazette through the U.S. Freedom of Information Act.

Access to Cotroni's FBI record was requested after he died of cancer on Aug. 17, 2004, at the age of 72. He was one of three brothers who controlled illegal rackets in Montreal for decades while they operated as a branch office for the Bonanno crime family in New York.

In April 1979, after serving four years of a 15-year sentence for cocaine trafficking in the U.S., Cotroni was paroled and released from a federal penitentiary in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. Two years later, the informant, who apparently served time at Lewisburg with the Montreal mobster, told the FBI that Cotroni and other Mafiosi discussed killing Burger and a U.S. district court judge based in New Jersey.

The earliest reference to the FBI investigation among the documents is a "priority" teletype communique warning of the alleged plot. It was sent on Dec. 18, 1981, from an FBI field office in Seattle, Washington, to the FBI's director and five FBI offices in the eastern U.S.

The message concluded with a plan to advise Burger of the suspected plot and to pursue leads "on a very discreet basis" by investigating the backgrounds of the suspects....
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antimafia
Posted: Jul 24 2007, 02:35 PM


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Report from Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta

Link to this recently published report is http://www.cisalberta.ca/Annual%20&%20Semi...rious_Crime.pdf.
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antimafia
Posted: Jul 24 2007, 02:37 PM


Toto Riina
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QUOTE (antimafia @ Jul 24 2007, 02:35 PM)
Report from Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta

Link to this recently published report is http://www.cisalberta.ca/Annual%20&%20Semi...rious_Crime.pdf.

Link to article about this topic, along with part of the article itself, appears below:

http://www.canada.com/reginaleaderpost/new...e1-4ce22e0b47cb

Hells Angels aren't province's top criminal threat: report
Jason van Rassel
CanWest News Service

Saturday, July 21, 2007

CALGARY -- At a time when Hells Angels are gathering outside Calgary to celebrate the group's 10th anniversary in Alberta, law enforcement agencies are identifying another gang -- the Crazy Dragons -- as the province's top criminal threat.

The Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta's annual report, obtained Friday by the Calgary Herald, identifies 54 criminal groups of varying sophistication operating in the province.

The report bleakly predicts the province's booming economy will allow organized crime groups to maintain their grip on the underworld, while police deal with the fallout among the working poor and drug addicted.

The report is a collection of intelligence from Alberta's law enforcement agencies.

"The most noticeable criminal group in Alberta -- with cocaine operations throughout the province as well as in parts of British Columbia, Saskatchewan and the Northwest Territories -- is known to police as the Crazy Dragons," the report says....
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antimafia
Posted: Jul 24 2007, 07:08 PM


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QUOTE (antimafia @ Jul 24 2007, 02:35 PM)
Report from Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta

Link to this recently published report is http://www.cisalberta.ca/Annual%20&%20Semi...rious_Crime.pdf.

Link to article about this topic, along with part of the article itself, appears below:

http://www.canada.com/calgaryherald/news/s...e0-9b85c7bd3de6

Organized crime rampant in south
$1 million worth of cocaine sold each month in 'Hat
Gwendolyn Richards
Calgary Herald

Sunday, July 22, 2007

Gangs and organized crime groups continue to feed drug problems in communities across southern Alberta -- with at least one city dealing with millions of dollars of cocaine being sold monthly -- says a report on organized and serious crime in the province.

But city officials and police are working to fight the problem.

According to the Criminal Intelligence Service Alberta's annual report, Medicine Hat, Brooks and Lethbridge are among a number of communities dealing with several groups trafficking illegal drugs, particularly cocaine.

In Medicine Hat's case, well-established gangs from Calgary, along with dealers from Brooks, are bringing drugs to the city.

"Police in Medicine Hat are faced with a phenomenon whereby more than $1 million in cocaine is being sold by wholesalers -- with a street value nearing $2.5 million -- each month in the city alone," the report states....
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Laurentian
Posted: Jul 27 2007, 05:40 AM


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