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 Canadian Underworld, All but Bikers
Don
Posted: Apr 2 2009, 04:33 PM


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Hitman pleads guilty to 27 murders

CANADA – A hitman whose victims included bikers, mafiosi and innocent bystanders has admitted 27 charges of murder in a case that makes him one of Canada’s worst killers.

Gerald Gallant, a police informant who was already serving a life sentence for a 2001 killing, also pleaded guilty on Tuesday to 12 charges of attempted murder and a handful of other charges.

The killings took place between 1978 and 2003 and targeted outlaw bikers, street-gang members and mobsters.

Biker gangs have long been a problem in the French-speaking province of Quebec and most of the murders happened between 1994 and 2002 as the Hells Angels and Rock Machine gangs battled over drug turf.

Gallant’s victims include such bystanders as Helene Brunet, a waitress who was wounded in 2000 while being used as a human shield by Robert Savard, a close associate of Hells Angels kingpin Maurice (Mom) Boucher.

And in 1999, Gallant shot dead Luc Bergeron, a private detective who happened to be living in an apartment formerly occupied by the intended target, a Hells Angels associate.

Gallant (58) apologised as he read out a prepared statement in front of survivors and relatives of victims.

“I regret the hurt I have caused the victims and their families,” Gallant said in the Quebec City court. “I understand that forgiving will be difficult, maybe even impossible. I accept that.

“I agreed to co-operate with police in order to repair the damage I caused and to seek forgiveness.”

Prosecutor Martine Berube said she believed the case “will possibly go down in history”.

At least one Quebec man has killed more people than Gallant. Yves (Apache) Trudeau, a founding member of the Hells Angels in Quebec, was sentenced to life in prison in 1986 after pleading guilty to 43 counts of manslaughter, part of a deal struck in exchange for information about fellow gang members.

Last week, acting on information provided by Gallant, police arrested 10 people across Quebec in connection with dozens of murders linked to outlaw biker gangs over a 25-year period.

Charges against those arrested include murder and conspiracy.

“It serves to remind people what a murderous biker war was happening,” said Julian Sher, author of two books about Canadian biker gangs.

“Twenty-seven gang-related killings out of 160 total biker-related murders during that period. That’s stunning. The worst period of Al Capone’s Chicago was never that bad.”

What made Gallant dangerous, said Mr Sher, was that as a contract killer he was never a full-patch member of any biker gang, and therefore could serve as a hitman for anyone.

Gallant will not get any additional jail time and will be eligible to apply for parole in 25 years. – (AP)
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Hollander
Posted: Apr 3 2009, 04:14 AM


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QUOTE (Don @ Apr 2 2009, 04:33 PM)
Hitman pleads guilty to 27 murders

CANADA – A hitman whose victims included bikers, mafiosi and innocent bystanders has admitted 27 charges of murder in a case that makes him one of Canada’s worst killers
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Don
Posted: Apr 3 2009, 01:57 PM


Carlo Gambino
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Well they say old news is best lol.

My bad.
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GangstersInc
Posted: Jun 9 2009, 04:33 AM


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The evolution of organized crime in B.C.

Many criminal groups have become increasingly sophisticated, widespread -- and violent

By Kim Bolan, Vancouver SunJune 7, 2009
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/evolution...9703/story.html

VANCOUVER — Brianna Kinnear was just 22 when she was gunned down in a borrowed truck on the side of a Port Coquitlam street Feb. 2.

Kevin LeClair was a little older at 26 when he was sprayed with automatic gunfire in a busy mall parking lot four days later.

And Betty Yan was 39 when she was found shot to death in a grey Mercedes at a dark industrial Richmond strip mall April 15.

All three were targeted for death because of their rung in the hierarchy of one of B.C.'s 135 crime groups.

Kinnear worked on the front lines selling drugs in a street crew operating throughout the Tri-Cities. LeClair was mid-level, a member of the notorious Red Scorpion gang, who ran more than a dozen drug lines. And Yan was one of those rarer hits of someone connected to the top-echelon crime groups in B.C., in her case the Big Circle Boys.

With billions of dollars a year at stake and an unprecedented number of groups vying for territory and profits, police and academics say there is an increasing sophistication in the way crime groups do business here.

At the same time, there has been a record number of gangland slayings, most of them of mid-level or front-line drug dealers.

"It is still a very diverse illicit market per se," said Supt. Brian Cantera, who heads the RCMP's regional drug section. "It has still got the potential for huge profits and there are those who are fighting over those profits.

"If you take a look at the level of violence we've seen, there are a lot more gang-related homicides or mid-level drug trafficking homicides than we've seen in the past," Cantera said.

It is rare for someone like Yan, a loan shark with tentacles deep into organized crime groups, to be targeted. More commonly, those sacrificed in the war are front-line soldiers like Kinnear or gang members like LeClair, possibly targeted because of his association with gangsters such as Jonathan, Jarrod and Jamie Bacon.

Cantera said it is difficult to quantify exactly how much money is passing through B.C. crime groups every year. One estimate has pegged the province's marijuana industry alone to be worth $7 billion annually.

'A NEED FOR HIERARCHY'

Criminologist Stephen Schneider, who has just released a book on the history of organized crime in Canada, says there has been a shift in how crime groups operate in B.C. and other provinces.

"There has definitely been an historic evolution in all aspects of organized crime," Schneider said. "Sophistication. Power. Wealth. Reach.

"As the groups have become more powerful and more widespread, just like a legitimate corporation, there is a need for hierarchy. So you have seen, as the groups evolve, increases in hierarchy."

In B.C., that hierarchical structure looks a pyramid with groups such as the Hells Angels, the Mafia, the Big Circle Boys and other Asian triads at the top.

They have long historic roots, international connections, sophisticated structures, exclusive memberships and are often dealing with tens of millions of dollars a year.

Sometimes they are directly linked to mid-level groups such as the Red Scorpions, the Independent Soldiers and the United Nations -- all brand-name gangs that morphed out of smaller groups involved in the drug trade over the last decade.

The mid-level groups range in size and sophistication. The UN, for example, has about 100 members and more entrenched indoctrination, much like the top-level groups.

When police raided the houses of leader Clay Roueche last year, they found a score sheet indicating almost $900,000 in drug transactions. The gang bought two aircraft to smuggle drugs across the border, a crime to which Roueche has pleaded guilty in the U.S.

Roueche also boasted in bugged conversations to having his own contacts in Colombia and other source countries.

The Scorpions, started in a youth detention centre nine years ago, number no more than about 25, says Sgt. Shinder Kirk, of the B.C. Integrated Gang Task Force. Yet the Scorpions have been linked to some of the worst gang violence in B.C. history, including the slaughter of six people in a Surrey high-rise in October 2007.

Mid-level gangs might have an annual cash flow ranging from a few hundred thousand to millions of dollars.

Crews like Kinnear's can be independent operators or tied vertically to a gang.

But as Abbotsford Police Chief Bob Rich said last month, so-called street-level dealers get linked by rivals to the gang with which they do business, regardless of whether the connection is real or perceived.

"Any young person out there now -- because of the potential for retaliation and the confusion that exists over who is associated with who -- is at risk if they are involved in the drug trade," Rich warned.

Front-line drug crews are earning thousands to tens of thousands a month, but are also the ones taking most of the risk, whether it is of arrest or violent underworld retaliation.

Kirk said the top-level crime groups are deliberately insulating themselves "from not only the general day-to-day business, but from the dirty business.

"They still profit from the illegal activities of those at the lower level."

The mid-level gangs "work horizontally with other groups at the same level, but also vertically within the triangle."

Some of the front-line and mid-level gangs were actually set up by top groups, Kirk said.

"You've got puppet clubs that may be newer on the scene than some of the more recognized puppet clubs that have been around for a long time. So that is more insulation and evolution in the sense of getting someone else to do your dirty work."

Some mid-level groups or even unknown "freelancers" are involved in cross-border smuggling, Kirk said, because the profits are so high if they can find a mode of transportation and a route.

ACTIVITY STRADDLES BORDER

Last month, B.C. tow truck driver Robert Fox was arrested near Sacramento, Calif. with $7 million worth of ecstasy and more than $400,000 cash. He has no criminal record here, but is now facing serious U.S. charges.

"There is a capacity for an individual or a group at any level to cement international ties into the U.S. or overseas," Kirk said. "You can have a subcontractor who develops a smuggling route and was contracting his services out to individuals who have product. He would then guarantee delivery or make arrangements for delivery."

B.C. drug gangs learned from the huge Colombian cartels of the 1990s how to create "corporate hierarchal structures," Schneider said.

But the Colombians wanted to control all aspects of the drug deals from production to purchase to delivery, while new crime groups hire specialists at different stages, Schneider said.

"One of the trends in organized crime over the last 20 years has been less self-contained hierarchical groups that work exclusively on their own and towards incredible networking of small groups, of larger groups, of individuals, and that's why the problem has proliferated in that you have this cooperation," he said.

"It is almost like you have specialization and division of labour, where one group specializes in providing the product, the other in transporting it, the other in marketing it at the street level, another wholesaling it."

When Metro Vancouver's Rob Shannon was sentenced to 20 years for his role in a multimillion-dollar cross-border drug trafficking ring linked to the Hells Angels, Chief U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik did not accept the prosecution's position that Shannon was the overall crime boss.

Lasnik did accept that Shannon headed the transport division of the criminal enterprise, specializing in creative cross-border smuggling modes, and slapped him with a 20-year sentence.

That makes sense, according to Schneider, whose book Iced: The Story of Organized Crime in Canada, was recently published.

"We are seeing these very large criminal conspiracies but again, they are operating on a network basis and that allows for more fluidity, flexibility, and it also is strategic in that if one cell or partner gets busted, there is less chance the police can go to another cell because the relationship is not as strong."

The fluidity, ever-changing allegiances and networking, coupled with increasing sophistication of the schemes, makes the job even tougher for law enforcement agencies, as well as the courts, Schneider said.

"Our criminal justice system now simply cannot cope with the scope of the problem -- the level of sophistication. Our prosecutorial services are just cut to the bone provincially and federally and they cannot take on sophisticated cases or large cases, and that's why you see so many of them being plea-bargained."

NEW LAWS CALLED FOR

Police have had to strategize and to some degree, mirror the structure of the criminal hierarchy, having different agencies tackle different levels of organized crime and gangs.

To effectively go after the highest ranks, police need legislative changes making it easier to seize the proceeds of crime, Cantera said.

"What we need are laws that make asset seizure and forfeiture of assets more easily attainable for police. That's what we need to protect the public. That is at the root of the problem," Cantera said. "What makes the upper echelon more vulnerable is when they attain their assets. That's when they become vulnerable to law enforcement and it has been difficult for us to be able to get to it."

Cantera said the drug trade works very much like the legitimate business world.

"You have the manufacturer, you have the wholesaler, and you have the guy who is selling it out of the business," he said.

Which one is the most powerful crime group in the province varies depending on the groups' success getting their products in and out of the country, Cantera said.

"You are only as big as your last importation."

Cantera thinks the increase in gang murders is in part due to the increasing importance of gun trafficking in the underworld business model. He said they are using marijuana and synthetic drug profits to get more guns into Canada.

"When you have access to firearms, you are potentially going to use them."

But Schneider, who teaches at Halifax's St. Mary's University, thinks the violence in B.C. has resulted from a fracturing of traditional organized crime codes.

"At least the Italian Mafia had certain codes: You didn't shoot police officers. You didn't shoot people's relatives. You didn't get kids involved," Schneider said. "There are no rules any more."

High-level groups are deliberately engaging more vulnerable groups at the lower end of their crime chain.

"You have these upper-level, very sophisticated powerful criminals like the Hells Angels, or mainland Chinese or others and then they use immigrants or young offenders to do all the dirty work," Schneider said

"In B.C. and Quebec, you now see innocent people being deliberately targeted. You look at Mexico. There is no honour among thieves any more. There are no rules any more and that is the scariest part of this, and that is why the problem has become so bad in B.C. and Mexico."

kbolan@vancouversun.com

- - -

GANG WARS: JUSTICE IN OUR TIMES

A special Vancouver Sun five-day series which looks at the hierarchy of B.C.'s 135 crime groups.

Saturday/Sunday: A guide to gang structure in B.C.

Monday, June 7: An overview of the gang problem in the U.S., Mexico and Central America, and the links to B.C.

Tuesday, June 8: How police and prosecutors tackle gangs in B.C.

Wednesday, June 9: What our judges do when gangsters get to court.

Thursday, June 10: How can we stop our children from becoming involved in gangs?

Expert panel: Live streaming of Justice Education Society video at vancouversun.com, June 11, 7 p.m.


--------------------
Check out the Gangsters Inc website for all your news and info about organized crime and the mafia!
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Hollander
Posted: Jun 25 2009, 03:50 AM


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Accused Mafia boss had violent past
Posted: June 24, 2009, 7:44 PM by Ron Nurwisah
Crime


By Adrian Humphreys, National Post

TORONTO • After Peter Scarcella was sentenced in the notoriously bungled gangland plot that paralyzed an innocent bystander, the man long named as an influential Mafia boss arrived at the imposing maximum-security Millhaven prison and was “very surprised” to find officials linking him to organized crime, he says.
He might have been the only one taken aback.

http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/t...olent-past.aspx
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Hollander
Posted: May 3 2010, 04:50 AM


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Montreal’s new crime brokers need to be flexible

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Montre...l#ixzz0mrWwlZJw
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Hollander
Posted: May 11 2010, 04:02 AM


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Hollander
Posted: May 26 2010, 04:03 AM


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Peter
Posted: Jul 27 2010, 10:56 PM


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Gang leader to be released from jail

By Paul Cherry, Montreal Gazette July 27, 2010

Despite showing little progress toward rehabilitation while serving the past eight years behind bars, Gerald (Gerry) Matticks is scheduled to be released long before the end of his 12-year prison term.

Matticks, reputed to be a leader in the West End Gang, will reach his statutory release date on Aug. 6, the two-third mark of the sentence he received in 2002 after pleading guilty to several charges related to multi-million dollar drug smuggling conspiracies carried out through the Port of Montreal.

Because he was previously turned down for parole, twice, Matticks automatically qualifies for a release under federal sentencing laws. The National Parole Board was recently left with the sole option of releasing him and imposing strict conditions on Matticks's release, despite being advised he made "no particular progress and (has) gained no significant insight into (his) criminal involvement in the (drug smuggling) offences."

Matticks, worked at the port during the 1970s and he wielded considerable influence there while he was snared in a police investigation into how the Hells Angels handled the millions of dollars they made while controlling a large share of drug trafficking in Montreal. Money secretly flowed through apartments in Anjou that the biker gang used as banks, complete with safes, money counters and a computerized accounting system. When the police figured out their accounting system they noticed large amounts of money were being paid to an account belonging to Matticks.

Investigators later learned Matticks was using his influence at the port to help the Hells Angels get hundreds of kilograms of cocaine through. It was alleged during subsequent trials, involving members of the Hells Angels, that Matticks made $13 million in 2000 alone while he helped the biker gang. Matticks denied this during a parole hearing in 2009.

Now, according to a written summary of the parole board's decision to impose conditions, Matticks, 70, wants to "withdraw" to a farm he owns when he is released. His case management team advised the parole board that they "are not convinced that (Matticks) will not be tempted to resume (his) criminal activities once back in the community." They also described his release plan a "rather vague and unstructured." Because of this, the parole board has required that Matticks supply a financial accounting of his revenue and expenses to a parole officer during the remaining four years of his sentence.

He is also required to complete a "community skills maintenance program" and to avoid meeting with anyone he believes might have a criminal record.

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Junior
Posted: Mar 15 2011, 04:40 PM


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Mob arsenal found in Montreal warehouse
UPI.Com, March 15, 2011

MONTREAL, March 15 (UPI) -- Police in Montreal say they're concerned about a possible war between Canadian organized crime families after finding a warehouse full of weapons.

The force said in a statement Tuesday the weapons cache was discovered Feb. 1 and investigators kept it quiet while scouring security video and following paper evidence trails, the QMI Agency reported.

"Investigators have positively identified the person who owns this warehouse," the statement said. "He is known to police for having links to Italian organized crime."

Officers found a "massive" arsenal of submachine guns, explosives, smoke-bombs and ammunition, the report said.

Police raided the warehouse based on a tip, The (Montreal) Gazette reported.

Since 2009, authorities say, the Rizzuto family has come under deadly challenges for its 30-year control of loansharking, drugs and money laundering in the city, QMI said.

Family patriarch Nick Rizzuto was gunned down last fall in front of his wife and daughter outside their home. His son, Nick Jr. was shot down in public in 2009.

The eldest son, Vito, is due to be released from a U.S. federal prison in Colorado next year, after serving more than three years for his role in a triple homicide in 1981, the report said.
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Junior
Posted: May 20 2011, 04:26 PM


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Police arrest 39 in organized crime probe
By Galit Rodan, Star Staff Reporter
Thursday, May 19, 2011

Police have arrested 39 people and laid 192 charges, including attempted murder and firearm trafficking, as part of an organized crime investigation.

Members of the Toronto Police Organized Crime-Firearm Enforcement Unit conducted “project OB,” a joint-forces operation, Thursday.

Police said they executed 30 search warrants of Toronto homes and businesses. They seized five loaded firearms, 12 ounces of heroin, 10 ounces of cocaine, marijuana plants, $60,000 cash, as well as body armour and two vehicles.

Those arrested are accused of smuggling firearms from the U.S. to Canada last summer for Toronto gang members, and of smuggled drugs into the U.S.

Other charges include drug trafficking, altering the serial number on a firearm and assault in aircraft in flight.
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Junior
Posted: May 22 2011, 08:00 AM


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Lawyer’s visits to mobster hurt chances of parole
By Adrian Humphreys, National Post
May 20, 2011

Repeated visits by a particular lawyer to an imprisoned mobster is evidence of the notorious gangster’s ongoing connection to organized crime, an association that is so strong he is too dangerous to release, the Parole Board of Canada says.

Juan Ramon Fernandez, named as the main muscle in Ontario for Vito Rizzuto, Montreal boss of the Sicilian Mafia, was denied release from prison until the end of his sentence, when he is to be deported from Canada.

The unusual move, given Canada’s parole allowances that require prisoners be released after serving two-thirds of their sentence unless shown to be too dangerous, suggests an improper relationship between a member of the bar and a feared mobster.

“Your ongoing visits from a lawyer who has worked for persons identified as being part of organized crime further reinforces your continuing involvement with this criminal subculture,” says the parole board’s decision this month. The lawyer is not named.

Fernandez, 54, was convicted on drug, fraud and counselling-to-commit-murder charges after a large joint police operation in Ontario in 2004.

The suspicious meetings between Fernandez and a lawyer were not the only reasons the parole board denied Fernandez his freedom, however.

“Several correctional officers witnessed death threats you made to another guard who was attempting to search you. During this incident, you seemed to flaunt your well-established ties to traditional organized crime in an effort to further intimidate the guard; this implies you remain connected to the same criminal lifestyle that enabled your considerable drug dealing activities,” the board’s decision says.

“Although the guard you threatened has since decided against pursuing criminal charges for personal reasons, the board notes a serious institutional charge remains outstanding in connection with this incident and that your security classification was again increased to maximum.”

Also unusual in the case is that Fernandez seems to prefer a maximum-security institution while most inmates fight vociferously to cascade to lower security institutions where they have more freedom and privileges.

The board notes that he had previously refused a transfer to a medium-security facility and that the threat against the guard came just days after his security classification was decreased to medium, ruining another opportunity for him to transfer down.

The reference to the lawyer’s visits to Fernandez adds to questions previously raised about the use of lawyers by members of the Mafia, particularly the Rizzuto criminal organization that once ruled Canada’s underworld.

Police suspected a handful of practising lawyers played an indispensable role for mobsters by protecting sensitive meetings from police scrutiny, subscribing to cellphone numbers for mobsters in order to thwart police eavesdropping and relaying messages between mobsters.

Despite Fernandez spending most of his incarceration in maximum security, he still managed to arrange hash shipments from Jamaica, tamper with a witness testifying against him and orchestrate an attack on an inmate at another prison, authorities alleged. He is also considered a “person of interest” in the eventual murder of the man he was convicted of conspiring to kill when he was arrested.

The board previously said Fernandez had “psychopathic tendencies,” “egocentricity, narcissism, grandiosity” and “callousness.”

Fernandez is slated for deportation to his native Spain when released. He has already been deported twice before, both times illegally returning under a false identity.
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Junior
Posted: May 24 2011, 03:28 PM


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Laval police arrest suspect with organized crime link in connection with murder
CTV.ca, Monday, May 23, 2011

LAVAL — Laval police arrested a 38-year-old man they suspect is linked with organized crime Monday in connection with an afternoon murder in Chomedey one day earlier.

Police have yet to release the name of the victim, who was gunned down Sunday in a parking lot near a large shopping mall in broad daylight.

"We found out that he might have a certain link with organized crime," said Laval Police spokesperson Nathalie Laurin. "It's probably a story of a settling of accounts."

People in the neighbourhood called 9-1-1 shortly after 5 p.m. when they heard gunshots coming from the parking lot of 3330 Le Carrefour Blvd.

The suspect and the victim were parked side by side in the lot talking to each other, police say, before the shots were fired.

Police arrived to find a 45-year-old man sitting slumped in a car, suffering from several bullet wounds.

He was alive while paramedics rushed him to hospital but died shortly after his arrival in the emergency room.

Police say the man was not carrying any identification but they determined that he was sitting in his daughter's car, and that he lived in a condo at 3330 Le Carrefour Blvd.

Officers spoke with the man's daughter Monday morning and she confirmed that the slain man was her father.

Once they learned of the link to organized crime, police say the investigation moved along much faster.

"Once we got his identity we found out a little bit his past and this permitted us to make this arrest early this morning," Laurin said.

On Monday morning police tracked down the suspect to Laval's North Shore and made the arrest.

The incident had some of the neighbourhood's residents uneasy on Monday.

"It's shocking a little bit because we're not used to see stuff like this in a big building like this," said Lina Rafla. "I'm a little bit worried."
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Junior
Posted: May 26 2011, 06:38 PM


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B.C. police crack major drug operation while probing man's disappearance
By KIM BOLAN, VANCOUVER SUN, May 25, 2011

Loretta Copley is hoping that a massive police investigation that uncovered a drug gang linked to Eastern European organized crime might bring some answers to her brother's disappearance four years ago.

Ron Carlow vanished from his Vancouver apartment on June 20, 2007, leaving his girlfriend and family desperate with worry.

The missing person investigation by Vancouver Police uncovered Carlow's association with members of the gang that police now say is involved in illicit drug production, stolen property and firearms.

VPD passed on some of its findings to the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, which then launched an intensive year-long undercover probe of the drug ring.

Supt. Pat Fogarty revealed the results of that investigation Wednesday, announcing drug production, trafficking and gun charges against Surrey resident Ante Dragusica, 35, and Ivan Georgiev, 39, of Langley.

And he showed off what was seized during searches of three Surrey properties and a rural residence north of Kamloops: 32 firearms, ammunition, silencers, a grenade, explosive precursor chemicals and sophisticated "super-lab" equipment used to manufacture methamphetamine and ecstasy.

Fogarty said the gang was also manufacturing its specialized equipment so it could be sold to other criminals in B.C. wanting to set up clandestine labs.

"We have never before seen a manufacturing plant for labs," Fogarty said.

"In simple terms, they were operating one-stop shopping for the manufacturing of lab equipment and illicit drugs."

While Fogarty said police are pleased to have dismantled dangerous drug labs and taken dozens of firearms off the street, investigators are still trying to find Carlow and provide his family with some closure.

"While Mr. Carlow is technically listed as missing, we believe he may have met with foul play," Fogarty said.

As he spoke, Copley sat quietly in the room, metres away from the firearms on display, wiping tears from her eyes.

Afterwards, she told reporters that she was grateful for the efforts of investigators, but still devastated not to know what happened to Carlow, who was 38 when he disappeared.

"I just can't thank everybody -- the whole team -- for what they have done to try to bring my brother home for us - so much hard work and time and manpower and risking lives and there is one piece still missing and that's Ron," Copley said. "We need anybody who knows anything -- we are begging -- please come forward. Let us bury him and let us bring him home."

She said Carlow was a doting uncle, whose three nephews and a niece miss terribly.

"I never expected for my family to be facing this situation. It is devastating," she said.

Vancouver Police S.Sgt. Joanne Boyle said she could not elaborate on what investigators discovered linking Carlow to the organized crime group.

But she hopes that someone with knowledge of what happened will finally call the VPD at 604-717-2500.

"There has been a passage of four years and those people who were maybe peripherally involved, we can offer assistance and protection to them," Boyle said. "Maybe something has changed in their life. Maybe the guilt is getting to them. Or they are trying to turn their life around."

Fogarty said that investigators set up surveillance on both the Surrey addresses and the rural acreage in Pritchard, north of Kamloops, for several months before executing search warrants.

In Surrey, they witnessed welding and construction they now believed was linked to making the lab equipment. When they entered the properties, they found enough explosive precursor chemicals in one to have taken out the Pattullo bridge.

And in Pritchard, they saw an underground bunker being constructed to operate the drug lab.

Georgiev and his common-law wife lived on the rural property with their toddler, he said.

"We were able to see the husband and wife continually packing firearms, pistols . . . .as they walked through the property," Fogarty said.

"It was set up somewhat like a military compound in terms of protecting themselves. They had cameras up in the trees. They had an electric fence around the property and within the interior perimeter. They also had pit bulls in the interior perimeter making it almost impossible for us to execute the warrant."

When police did get inside, they were disturbed to find a grenade in the child's bedroom and boxes of ammunition under the crib.

"These things were littered throughout the house," he said pointing to rifles and handguns on display at the news conference. "Most of them were completely loaded, ready to go, some of which didn't have the safeties on and this two-year old child was able to run around."

The toddler was turned over the social workers and is now living with relatives, Fogarty said.

Fogarty would not elaborate on the links to Eastern European crime groups. He said both Dragusica and Georgiev are Canadian citizens and were known to police before the recent investigation.

Dragusica remains in custody and is due back in Surrey Provincial Court June 2. Georgiev pleaded guilty to six firearms counts in February and got a three-year sentence. He is due to appear in a Kamloops courtroom June 2 on the drug production charges.

Said Fogarty: "This was a sophisticated, well-organized drug operation that encompassed many aspects of organized crime, including the manufacturing of drugs and guns."
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Peter
Posted: May 30 2011, 12:04 AM


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Back in april the police in Montreal got their hands on a lot of heroin, 35 kg, supposed to be supplied by Turkish organised crime. Here's an article in French about the Turks in Montreal.

Le pain et le beurre du crime organisé turc

Daniel Renaud
28/05/2011

Derrière la saisie record de 35 kg d'héroïne effectuée le mois dernier se cache l'un des acteurs incontournables du trafic de cette drogue dure à Montréal : l'énigmatique et redoutable crime organisé turc.

Comme les Italiens, les Turcs sont regroupés dans plusieurs cellules, mais contrairement à leurs concurrents latins qui fonctionnent de façon indépendante, les cellules turques relèveraient d'un même patron, selon la police.

Également actifs dans le trafic d'armes, c'est toutefois l'héroïne qui est leur pain et leur beurre depuis des années.

Ils contrôleraient au moins 30 % du marché à Montréal, ce qui est autant sinon plus que le crime organisé italien.

Généralement, les Turcs importent de l'héroïne brune qui est habituellement fumée par les consommateurs.

Les 35 kg saisis en avril étaient toutefois de l'héroïne blanche, normalement consommée par injection. Si elle avait atteint la rue, une telle quantité leur aurait rapporté 50 millions $ et permis la vente sur la rue durant plus d'un an.

«Les sujets turcs ne roulent pas sur l'or. Avec tous les profits qu'ils génèrent, on peut se demander où sont détournés les profits et au bénéfice de qui», affirme le commandant de la Division du crime organisé de la police de Montréal, Denis Mainville, qui n'exclut pas que le trafic d'héroïne serve à financer le terrorisme.

«Depuis deux ans, nous avons constaté beaucoup plus d'activités liées au crime organisé turc, en particulier dans Parc-Extension», poursuit M. Mainville.

«Les Turcs sont en restructuration. Ils ne prennent pas plus de territoire, mais ils sont plus actifs», ajoute-t-il.

«Les Turcs, avec les Italiens, sont les plus gros fournisseurs d'héroïne à Montréal. Ils ne sont pas des amis, mais, lorsque l'une des deux organisations en manque, ils vont négocier durement», dit-il.

Pizza à l'héroïne

Même si les Turcs sont avant tout des importateurs qui vendent au plus offrant, ils vendent aussi de l'héroïne sur la rue et dans des commerces avec l'aide de téléavertisseurs et de téléphones cellulaires.

Ils sont plus présents dans le nord de Montréal, en particulier dans les secteurs Parc-Extension et Villeray.

Leur quartier général serait un restaurant situé près de Saint-Léonard.

Des sources ont indiqué au Journal que des pizzérias et des stationnements au centre-ville appartenant à des Turcs ont déjà servi de comptoirs de vente d'héroïne, mais également à blanchir l'argent provenant de la vente des stupéfiants.

«Dans les pizzérias, à une certaine époque, tu pouvais donner un numéro de commande et on te livrait de l'héroïne avec ta pizza», nous a confié une source.

Il semble cependant qu'une infime partie des pizzérias turques ou kurdes soient mêlées à ce stratagème.

Selon nos sources, les incendies criminels survenus dans des pizzérias kurdes, à Montréal et sur la Rive-Sud ces derniers mois, auraient davantage à voir avec une lutte entre compétiteurs et une affaire d'assurances plutôt qu'une guerre pour un territoire de la vente d'héroïne.

Double meurtre

En revanche, cette drogue serait au coeur des meurtres de deux individus d'origine turque froidement abattus alors qu'ils sortaient d'un commerce de la rue Bélanger, près de la 30e Avenue, dans le quartier Rosemont, le soir du 22 janvier.

L'un d'eux, Osman Haybat, 36 ans, serait celui qui était principalement visé alors que l'autre, âgé de 24 ans, aurait été son garde du corps.

Une affaire d'héroïne et d'argent serait le mobile de cette affaire qui a toutes les apparences d'un règlement de compte ou peut-être même d'une purge interne.

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Eroglu prenait trop de place

Assassiné en juillet 2007 parce qu'il prenait vraisemblablement trop de place, Hasan Eroglu est probablement la figure la plus connue du crime organisé turc de Montréal.

L'homme de 39 ans a été criblé de balles derrière une résidence de la rue Lakeshore, à Pointe-Claire.

Il avait fondé un groupe, le K-Crew (K pour kurde) dans lequel on retrouvait notamment des membres de gangs de rue.

L'un d'eux, craignant visiblement pour sa vie, a d'ailleurs été arrêté dernièrement après que les policiers eurent retrouvé trois armes à feu chez lui.

Au milieu des années 2000, les K-Crew se seraient fait des ennemis en tentant de prendre le contrôle d'établissements traditionnellement contrôlés par la mafia italienne sur la rue Saint-Laurent, entre les rues Sherbrooke et Des Pins.

Eroglu et son groupe auraient aussi tenté de prendre le contrôle d'un restaurant appartenant aux Hells Angels dans le même secteur et auraient fait fi des avertissements de ces derniers.

Hasan Eroglu, considéré par la police comme le numéro 1 du crime organisé turc, était très proche de certains membres du crime organisé italien, notamment Mike Lapolla, tué lors d'une dispute avec un membre des Rouges au Moomba de Laval, en mars 2004.

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Junior
Posted: Jul 6 2011, 02:00 AM


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Gangster back in jail for allegedly packing heat
By Nadia Moharib, Calgary Sun
Monday, July 4, 2011

Reputed gang member, Roland Chin, is facing numerous weapons-related charges, after a recent traffic stop.

A later search of an Escalade – believed to be obtained by crime — revealed a loaded handgun hidden in a cardboard box under its hood.

Acting Staff Sgt. Jason Walker, with the organized crime section’s community response unit ,said Chin was arrested on June 12 during a traffic stop in a black Escalade.

While police believe it was obtained by crime, and fraudulently registered to Chin, Walker said they do not know whether he was aware of those details or not, saying he may be “a legitimate victim.”

He is not facing any charges in relation to the vehicle and the investigation is ongoing.

Walker said police were searching for the vehicle not Chin when the arrest was made in the early-morning hours of June 12.

"Our investigation led us to believe it was obtained by crime and we made our frontline officers aware of the vehicle and that's how we found it," he said.

"Mr. Chin was cooperative."

Chin, who was sent to prison for 23-months for weapons and drug-related convictions, lost his brother Roger in a gang-related shooting in 2008.

Last July, Chin was given statutory release on those charges to serve the rest of his sentence in the community.

In August, Calgary police arrested him in a traffic stop wearing a bullet-proof vest , carrying two cell phones and he also had a pocketknife.

By November 2009, a National Parole Board panel revoked his release and sent him back to prison.

Chin, who has always denied being a gang member, said the phones belonged to his father who forgot them in the car and that, given fears by police he might be targeted in gang violence, the vest was for his protection.

At the time the panel said the decision was reached because Chin failed to follow conditions — including not having a cell phone, adhering to a curfew and avoiding gang members — imposed upon him.

"I'll be 26 in a month, I'm getting old, too old for this," he told the two-member panel at the time.

"I was trying to get my life together but it didn't work out too well .. I was trying."

At the time it was anticipated Chin’s new statutory release date would be in early 2011.

It is not known exactly when he was released again.

Walker said it is a relief to seize the loaded gun in the latest dealings with Chin.

"It comes down to public safety - there we have a loaded firearm in a vehicle being driven around on the streets," he said.

"To what end, I don’t know ... nothing good can come of it."

Chin is remanded in custody until July 6.

He is charged with numerous weapons-related charges including carry a concealed weapon and possesses an unlicensed weapon.
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Junior
Posted: Jul 13 2011, 03:41 PM


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Police beef up gang unit during turf war
By: Staff Writer, Winnipeg Free Press
07/13/2011

Mayor Sam Katz said police are making headway in a turf war between rival gangs.

Katz said Winnipeg Police Service has directed resources from the organized crime unit and the street crime unit toward the gang unit to deal with the escalating conflict. He said the key to cracking down on gangs is to be "in their face night and day" and that the additional gang unit resources will pay off.

During last fall's municipal election, Katz committed to hiring 58 additional police officers, including 20 who would be dedicated to the gang unit. He said a total of eight officers are already in service and another 24 will be working by next spring. In the interim, Katz said re-directing officers from organized crime and street crime to deal with the motorcycle gang problem is a good idea.

"I think taking resources from the street crime unit and having them work with gang unit is the right thing to do," he said. "I believe it's already showing that it's working and will continue to work."

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Junior
Posted: Jul 15 2011, 05:25 AM


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30 arrests in massive organized crime sweep 5
Toronto Sun, Thursday, July 14, 2011

OTTAWA — A massive organized crime sweep in eastern Ontario and western Quebec this week netted 30 arrests and resulted in 300 charges.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, provincial police officers, Mounties and officers from other forces involved in Project Cinderford raided homes and businesses after an 18-month investigation into organized crime groups in the region.

The primary focus of the raids was Cornwall, Ont., and the surrounding area.

In all, 20 search warrants were executed in Cornwall; Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry; Akwesasne; Ottawa; Gatineau; and Montreal.

Cops seized $3.1 million worth of drugs and contraband tobacco, including 1.75 kg of cocaine and 259 kg of marijuana. Police also found 12 firearms, including 2 AK-47s and a number of handguns along with thousands of rounds of ammunition and bulletproof vests.

Provincial police say there are eight outstanding arrest warrants.
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Junior
Posted: Sep 6 2011, 12:06 PM


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The scourge of human trafficking
By Joy Smith, Winnipeg Sun
Monday, Sep 5, 2011

Last week, criminologist John Lowman characterized the efforts of today’s anti-slavery leaders as “political posturing.”

He asserts they “cannot produce credible information for their claims” prostitution facilitates sexual exploitation and human trafficking.

In 2003, the Scottish Parliament commissioned the University of London to conduct a “comprehensive analysis of outcomes of prostitution policies in other countries.”

The study found the legalization and regulation of prostitution led to a dramatic increase in the involvement of organized crime in the sex industry, in child prostitution, in the number of foreign women trafficked into the region, and a general increase in violence against women.

A 2006 study examining legalized prostitution in the Netherlands found 60% of prostituted women suffered physical assaults, 70% experienced threats of physical assaults, 40% experienced sexual violence and 40% had been forced into prostitution or sexual abuse by acquaintances. Since then, Amsterdam has announced plans to shut down a third of its brothels.

This past July, a study published by U.S. clinical psychologist Melissa Farley examined the differences in the attitudes of 101 men who regularly bought sex and 100 men who did not buy sex in Boston. The study revealed alarming implications of normalizing and legalizing the sex trade. Sex buyers were far more likely than non-sex buyers to commit crimes, especially crimes of violence towards women. The study also revealed the attitudes of the sex buyers as dehumanizing towards women and lacking empathy for their suffering.

In Canada, studies by the RCMP, House of Commons Status of Women Committee, UBC professor Benjamin Perrin, and the Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC) have shown Canadian-born women and youth are vulnerable to sex slavery.

In particular, the 2008 CISC study found organized crime syndicates in Canada recruit Canadian-born women between the ages of 12-25 to traffic inter- and intra-provincially for the purposes of forced prostitution. The 2010 RCMP study, Hidden Abuse-Hidden Crime, revealed a number of groups of youth in Canada to be vulnerable to sex trafficking, especially youth from First Nations communities.

The credible information Lowman is looking for can be found by contacting the RCMP. So far, the RCMP have documented 49 ongoing cases of human trafficking before the courts involving 76 human traffickers and 143 victims. Out of these 49 cases, 44 are cases of domestic trafficking.

One sex buyer interviewed for the study by Farley said, “You can have a good time with the servitude.”

Legalizing prostitution is little more than normalizing the sexual servitude of women and youth.

As such, I am unapologetically for the abolition of prostitution, a system that dehumanizes and degrades humans and reduces them to a commodity to be bought and sold. This is the reality we face in Canada and the motivation for the Canadian government’s efforts to combat sexual exploitation and sex slavery.

Moving forward, our government will be implementing a National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking and supporting organizations that provide assistance to victims.
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Junior
Posted: Sep 9 2011, 02:18 PM


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Missing West Vancouver man has ties to United Nations gang
By Kim Bolan, Vancouver Sun. September 9, 2011

A West Vancouver man linked to the United Nations gang disappeared earlier this week - two days before he was to be sentenced in a drug trafficking case in Ontario.

Omid Bayani, 36, was last seen Monday afternoon en route to the gym, West Vancouver police Det. Tom Wolff von Gudenberg said Thursday.

His worried family reported him missing a day later, saying it was out of character for Bayani not to return home or call anyone.

Police are investigating whether Bayani's gangland history has somehow caught up with him, or whether he took off to avoid his sentencing. The Crown was seeking a jail term of between eight and nine years.

Bayani was arrested in 2007 along with Hells Angels in B.C. and Ontario after a massive Ontario Provincial Police undercover operation targeting the biker gang.

Despite being a ranking UN gang member at the time, Bayani had worked with the rival Angels in a conspiracy to traffic 600 litres of GHB - the date rape drug.

This past July, prosecutors stayed a charge of belonging to a criminal organization against Bayani and his co-accused. But Bayani was convicted on the drug charges.

Wolff von Gudenberg said Bayani, who is six feet tall and weighs 240 pounds, was last seen wearing a white or grey Under Armour shirt, blue Under Armour shorts, running shoes and ankle socks. Bayani worked out at two different North Shore community centres, he said.

"We don't have any confirmation that he got to the gym," Wolff von Gudenberg said.

Despite his criminal history, Bayani had not been on the radar of West Vancouver Police in recent months.

"It is impossible to speculate because we don't know anything about his real connections locally," Wolff von Gudenberg said. "He has been totally off our radar."

He said other Lower Mainland law enforcement agencies, including the Gang Task Force, have been contacted.

"Everybody's been notified just because of that history. Who knows if somebody has a source out there who knows something? He could be missing. He could have taken off," Wolff von Gudenberg said.

Port Moody police Insp. Andy Richards led the B.C. component of the Ontario investigation when he was with the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit. Richards said Thursday that he hasn't heard anything about Bayani since the 2007 arrest.

"He was a player. He was a big player at one time," Richards said. And he said Bayani had gang connections far beyond the UN, as indicated by his involvement with the Hells Angels.

News of Bayani's disappearance comes just a day after the head of the Gang Task Force, Supt. Tom McCluskie, said the police fear retaliation for the Aug. 14 murder of Red Scorpion Jonathan Bacon and wounding of Hells Angel Larry Amero and Independent Soldier James Riach.

Another West Vancouver man with gang links, Vahid Mahanian, vanished under similar circumstances June 27 and was found dead on Cypress Mountain two weeks later.

Bayani came to Canada as a refugee, but was ordered deported in 1999 after a series of armed robberies in Calgary. He filed a series of unsuccessful challenges against the deportation, but was never removed from Canada.
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Junior
Posted: Sep 15 2011, 02:36 PM


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Link between organized crime and construction clear: report
CTV.ca Montreal, Thursday, September 15, 2011

MONTREAL — It's been whispered about for years, but now the government's anti-corruption squad says it has proof that organized crime has infiltrated the construction industry and influenced political parties.

The report by former Montreal police chief Jacques Duchesneau and Quebec's anti-corruption squad and obtained by Radio-Canada and La Presse comes after a year-and-a-half-long investigation.

The UPAC (Unité permnanente anticorruption) report, which does not name any firms or individuals, found that prices are regularly hiked by engineering consulting companies and that contractors regularly overrun their costs.

It said Quebec's Transportation department is laidback about challenging prices, and when it challenges an invoice, the companies often launch a civil suit because they are aware the department will often settle out of court.

Even more damning, the report alleges that Transportation Ministry employees were paid to provide companies with privileged information so those businesses could win government contracts.

Transportation Minister has not seen report

On Thursday afternoon the newest Transportation Minister, Pierre Moreau, addressed the report even though he has yet to see it.

"I would like to see the accusations and I would like to see as far as I'm concerned as Transport Minister, measures that are implemented within the department to make sure what Mr. Duchesneau is telling us won't happen again," said Moreau.

The report also established a direct link between the road construction industry and secret financing of political parties.

Investigators referred to disturbing "influence peddling."

An extract from the report obtained by Radio-Canada read: "According to the testimony of a former political adviser, parties are always knocking at the door of the large engineering consulting and construction firms."

The report confirming allegations of corruption does not come as much of a surprise, especially since Quebecers have been clamouring for years for a full scale public inquiry into corruption and collusion in the construction industry.

Maud Cohen, the president of the Quebec Order of Engineers says corruption likely goes far beyond dealings with the provincial Transportation Ministry.

"It doesn't just concern the MTQ (Ministry of Transportation), which is only the little part that has been addressed by the report. It might concern also municipalities and other organizations that that manage major infrastructures," said Cohen.

To disclose or not to disclose

Moreau thinks it's quickly becoming a matter for the courts

"Whether they are politicians, whether they are civil servants, whether they are contractors, or they are engineers, I want them to be sued if they are acting in a criminal way," said Moreau.

However the minister does not think the public should see the report just yet.

"I don't want to interfere with the police investigation that is going on, so I don't think it would be wise to make the report public."

Cohen disagrees.

"Our feeling that the transparency will be required and the report will need to be published," said Cohen.
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Junior
Posted: Apr 12 2012, 03:07 PM


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Man wounded in police drug sweep; pot ring linked to Mafia
By Paul Cherry, Montreal Gazette, April 12, 2012

ST. ZOTIQUE – A 63-year-old man was in critical condition after he was shot while police carried out arrests in an investigation of a marijuana grow-op alleged to be tied to the Mafia.

The man was shot inside a small motel beside a lake in St. Zotique, about 70 kilometres southwest of Montreal, on Thursday morning as members of a Sûreté du Québec SWAT team moved in to arrest him.

Quebec City police have been called in to investigate the shooting, as per provincial legislation that prohibits a police force to probe incidents in which people have been killed or injured during one of its operations.

Later in the day Thursday, the Montreal police revealed they seized $660,000 from two safety deposit boxes belonging to the man who was shot in the raid.

The wounded man was taken to a hospital, where he was listed in critical but stable condition, Quebec City police Constable Marie Ève Painchaud said. The investigators assigned to take over the investigation of the shooting had yet to arrive at the motel as of 11 a.m., she said. Because of that, Painchaud explained, she could not comment on whether there was an exchange of gunfire between the 63-year-old drug-trafficking suspect and the SWAT team.

According to the owner of the motel, the man who was shot lived in an apartment that is connected to the same building but separate from her establishment.

According to police sources, the man who was shot is a person who has lived in the region surrounding Valleyfield for many years. He has lived at that address on Principale St. In St. Zotique for years and is currently charged with producing an illegal substance in Valleyfield court. On April 12, 2006, he was sentenced to a 2-year prison term for producing an illegal substance.

The Montreal police organized-crime division is in charge of the drug-trafficking investigation; the SQ was assisting, as were Laval police and the RCMP.

Four men – age between 29 and 63 - have been arrested, including a man who was picked up at Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport while he was about to head off on a vacation.

Six homes in the Montreal area and a warehouse in Laval were targeted in the raids. Montreal police Constable Anthony Cantelmi said five vehicles were also searched, as were two safety deposit boxes in banks. In all, 14 raids were carried out simultaneously at 6 a.m. Thursday, he said.

“These raids are related to people operating a marijuana grow-op,” Cantelmi said, adding that 5,000 to 10,000 marijuana plants were seized, along witb 30 kilograms of marijuana and $20,000 in cash.

The people arrested will be charged with producing marijuana, and possession of marijuana with intent to traffic, Cantelmi said.
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Junior
Posted: Apr 15 2012, 08:59 AM


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Man shot in raid on grow-op had ties to Hells Angels
By Paul Cherry, Montreal Gazette, April 14, 2012

The man shot by police in St. Zotique on Thursday, while arrests were made in connection with a marijuana growop, had close ties to the Hells Angels in Montreal, The Gazette has learned.

André Ferland, 63, of St. Zotique, was shot at least once as members of a Sûreté du Québec SWAT team stormed into his apartment early Thursday. He was taken to a hospital, where he was still reported to be in critical, yet stable, condition on Friday.

Ferland's criminal record is extensive and includes a conviction in the U.S. where he was sentenced, in Florida, to a five-year prison term for money laundering as part of a conspiracy to ship cocaine to Montreal for the Nomads chapter of the Hells Angels in 1997 and 1998. At the time, the now-defunct chapter was run by Maurice (Mom) Boucher, who is now serving a life sentence for plotting the murders of two prison guards. Court records detail how Ferland travelled to Venezuela for the biker gang to arrange for the cocaine shipments.

He was released from a U.S. penitentiary in 2005 but quickly reoffended, and in 2006 was sentenced in Valleyfield court to two years in prison for producing more than 2,500 marijuana plants.

According to a Parole Board of Canada decision in August 2006, Ferland had rarely held down a real job but claimed to work under the table repairing air conditioners. He told the parole board in 2006 that his criminal activity had more to do with a dire financial situation than an actual allegiance to any organized crime group.

Ferland also has been convicted of counterfeiting documents, identity theft and dealing in contraband tobacco.

The apartment where he was shot looks out over a section of the St. Lawrence River notorious for its popularity with contraband smugglers.

Three other men - André Goupil, 36, of Verdun; Louis Coulombe, 29, and Jean-François Chagnon, 47, both of Laval - arrested as suspects in a marijuana growoperation that the Montreal police allege is tied to "Italian organized crime" appeared before a judge at the Montreal courthouse Friday. They were ordered to remain in custody until their bail hearing.

A fifth man, Vincent Faucher, 39, of Valleyfield, is still being sought in the case.

The group targeted by the Montreal police organized-crime division was investigated for a little more than a month, according to the charges. All of the men, except for Faucher, are alleged to have grown marijuana in Laval from March 9 up to the day of the arrests. Faucher is charged with being in possession of marijuana and hashish, with intent to traffic, on the days of the raids. Twenty charges in all were filed in the case.

Police seized about 6,000 marijuana plants and more than 30 kilograms of marijuana after carrying out search warrants at several addresses, including two warehouses in Laval.

They also seized $660,000 from safety deposit boxes that the police allege are tied to Ferland.

According to a published report, Ferland was not armed when the police shot him. The investigation into why he was shot has been turned over to the Quebec City police because, as per provincial legislation, a police force cannot probe its own officers in an incident where someone is killed or injured.

Quebec City police Constable Christine Lebrasseur said Ferland's condition was still the same on Friday. She said she could not comment on the report that Ferland was unarmed because the investigation is continuing.
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Carmelo
Posted: Apr 19 2012, 02:15 PM


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Huge international drug bust nets 43 tonnes of hash

A massive quantity of hashish worth at least $860 million destined for the Port of Montreal was seized by authorities in Pakistan and Europe after a two-year investigation that involved the RCMP.

The seizure of more than 43 tonnes of the drug led to the arrest Wednesday of eight people in Montreal, three who worked for private companies at the port and the rest linked to the city's notorious West End Gang.

Police are seeking a ninth suspect in the case.

The charges include conspiracy, importing and possession of cannabis resin for the purpose of trafficking, the RCMP said.

The investigation - dubbed "Project Celsius" - began in 2009 and 2010 when drugs were discovered at the ports of Halifax and Montreal.

RCMP said the criminal organization involved in the case supplied the drugs from the Middle East, mainly Pakistan.

"The (drugs) were hidden within different parts of garments, and or food products, coffee slabs or whatever," RCMP Staff Sgt. Andre Potvin said Wednesday.

None of the hash actually made it to Montreal and was seized by police in Italy, Belgium and Pakistan, he said.

"We actually removed the drugs before they got to Montreal, and then we just let the container be transited through, unloaded off the ship, placed in to the yards and followed how these people were getting it through . . . outside the parameters of the Port of Montreal," Potvin said.

Only 200 out of 2,500 people who work at the Port of Montreal are directly employed by the agency and not everyone is subject to a security check, police said.

"There are a lot of people - truckers, longshoremen, people from customs - there are a whole bunch of people," said Jean-Luc Bedard, vice-president of operations at the Port of Montreal.

This is not the first time the port has been at the centre of a hash seizure linked to the West End Gang.

In 1994, 26 tonnes of hash was seized and leaders of the organization were arrested, resulting in a brief period where the street value increased due to a lack of supply.

The Mounties said major drug busts hurt organized crime groups.

"All the profits that would have been generated to organized crime are not getting into their pockets," said Potvin.

http://m.ctv.ca/topstories/20120419/hash-h...ust-120419.html
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Carmelo
Posted: Apr 29 2012, 08:59 AM


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Police arrest 11 in Mafia drug raids

Montreal police announced Friday they've made 11 arrests relating to a drug sale and distribution ring they say is linked to the Italian mob.

Police officers and anti-gang investigators conducted a total of 18 raids in the Montreal area Thursday, seizing 1.4 kilograms of cocaine, $50,000 in cash, four bulletproof vests, accounting books, and a variety of weapons, including machine guns and stun guns.

Those arrested are due to make court appearances Friday. They face a number of drug- and weapons-related charges.

The drug ring is said to have been active primarily in the east end and north end.

http://www.cjad.com/CJADLocalNews/entry.as...ntryID=10377568
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Junior
Posted: Jun 27 2012, 03:32 PM


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Two Albertans face charges over cocaine from Mexico
By Bill Kaufmann, C News, June 26, 2012

CALGARY -- Two Albertans face charges following the seizure of cocaine trafficked out of Mexico’s violent drug wars.

A third man arrested in a 15-month investigation involving the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is a Mexican resident, RCMP Staff Sgt. Gord Sage said.

“It’s certainly tied to organized crime in Mexico,” he said, noting the investigation once centered along the U.S-Mexico border.

The first seizure following work done by the Rocky Mountain Integrated Border Enforcement Team (IBET) occurred Juy 27, 2011, when 10 kg of cocaine were intercepted in Great Falls, Mont.

Authorities found the drug secreted in a truck compartment.

On March 22, 2012, another 6 kg of the drug was found by Canadian Border Services officials hidden in a piece of furniture at the international border crossing at Coutts, Alta.

The amounts seized is worth at least $2 million on the street, said Sage.

“It was in its purest form, you could probably stretch that dollar number even further,” he said.

“It’s a hugely significant result ... we dismantled this network and made it difficult for them to continue.”

The cocaine was to be distributed throughout Canada, he added.

On Tuesday, Jacob Dyck, 35, of Coaldale, Alta., and 31-year-old Abram Klassen of Taber, Alta., were arrested in Taber and are charged with importing and conspiracy to traffic cocaine.

Isaak Banman, 33, who was facing related charges in London, Ont., but fled to Chihuahua State, Mexico, is wanted under an arrest warrant.

The Canadian Justice Ministry could seek his arrest and deportation, Sage said.

About 50,000 people have been killed in Mexico’s drug war over the past six years, leading some Latin American leaders to call for drug legalization while blaming dope consumers in the U.S. and Canada for the bloodshed.
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Junior
Posted: Aug 1 2012, 03:28 PM


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More prisoners joining gangs behind bars
By Kathleen Harris, CBC News
July 31, 2012

The number of federal inmates who belong to gangs behind bars has climbed 32 per cent in the last five years, according to figures obtained by CBC News Network's Power & Politics.

That compares to an increase of less than five per cent of non-gang affiliated prisoners — and some experts are warning prisons have become a breeding ground for gang members who pose a greater threat to public safety after their release.

The number of offenders incarcerated or under community supervision identified with street, aboriginal, motorcycle, Asian and traditional organized criminal gangs has climbed to 2,358 as of April 2012 — up from 1,791 in 2007.

In those regions where overcrowding problems are worse, gang affiliation is also much higher. In the Prairies, nearly 40 per cent of inmates and offenders under community supervision belong to gangs. In Ontario, the figure is 23 per cent, and in Quebec it stands at nearly 22 per cent.

In the Prairies, double-bunking — a sign of overcrowded conditions — has jumped to more than 26 per cent from just under 12 per cent four years ago. In Ontario, it's now at nearly 23 per cent — up from nine per cent.

Research commissioned by the federal government three years ago warned that any strategy must be accompanied by appropriate funding and trained, skilled staff to execute it, and that overcrowding could undermine the plan.

"In addition, the appropriate resources must also be made available so that any initiatives are properly supported. For example, staff shortages, overcrowding, and cutbacks on resources — in other words, undermining the capacity — will reduce the success of any gang management strategy," concluded the team of experts from Calgary's Mount Royal College.

The Correctional Service of Canada says it's trying to tackle the problem by working with criminal justice partners at national, regional and local levels to enhance the strategic intelligence gathering and information sharing. Spokeswoman Sara Parkes says CSC also tries to encourage gang members to "disaffiliate" and prevent them from exercising influence and power in institutions and in the community.

Link to overcrowding dismissed

Kerry-Lynne Findlay, parliamentary secretary to the justice minister, called the rise in numbers "good news" because the gang members are behind bars instead of on the street. She dismissed any link to overcrowded prison conditions.

"It means our law and order initiatives are working. We have specifically targeted gang members in several pieces of legislation," she told Power & Politics host Evan Solomon.

But NDP MP Jack Harris said he was "shocked" to hear the government's "spin" on the numbers. He said more overcrowding and violent conditions combined with a lack of programs is forcing prisoners to join gangs out of self-defence.

"What that means frankly is that when they get out, they're going to go back in because they're going to go out and commit crimes as part of a gang they've joined in prison," he said. "I think this is very bad news — not good news as the government is saying."

Liberal MP Kevin Lamoureux also rejected the government's line, saying more prisoners are joining gangs inside, and increasing the dangers for penitentiary guards, staff and other inmates.

He said the substantial increase is a disturbing sign that CSC's anti-gang measures aren't working.

"The concern has got to be if they're in gangs in prison and ultimately they're going to be released, they're going back into communities. It's going to hurt community safety at the end of the day," he said.

Former public safety minister Stockwell Day, speaking on the "power panel" later on CBC News Network's Power & Politics, said gang activity of any kind is never good news.

"The fact is people are going to jail and they want to be part of groups where they can find protection and a common position on things. Any way you want to read this – it's not good news," he said.

But Mike Mueller, spokesman for Public Safety Minister Vic Toews, insists the government's tough-on-crime approach is working to end the "revolving door of the justice system."

"Since 2006, we have taken measures to ensure that the bad guys stay behind bars where they belong – including strong mandatory minimum sentences for drive-by shootings, and ensuring murders committed for the benefit of organized crime receive at least 25 years in prison. When the thugs and criminals who make up street gangs are locked up, they will not be out terrorizing our communities."
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Carmelo
Posted: Aug 12 2012, 04:36 PM


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Top gang banger identified as Anjou murder victim

MONTREAL - The reputed leader of the notorious Bo-Gars street gang, also known as the Reds, was gunned down in the crowded parking lot of the Galeries d’Anjou shopping centre on Friday night. Chénier Dupuy, 37, was sitting in his car when he was shot around 6:50 p.m.

Police found him near the car when they arrived. He was brought to a hospital where he was pronounced dead. A 32-year-old man, who police said Friday night is also tied to a street gang, was injured in the shooting but managed to flee into the mall.

The gunman is still at large, police said.

A few hours later and several kilometres away, 42-year-old Lamartine Paul was shot outside his apartment building on Samson Blvd. in Laval. Paul, a known street-gang member, had just arrived home and was walking through the parking lot behind the building when he was shot. He managed to walk to the front of the building before collapsing. He was unconscious but still breathing when police arrived and was brought to hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Paul’s cousin is influential alleged street-gang leader Ducarme Joseph who gained notoriety in March 2010 when gunmen opened fire inside his old-Montreal clothing boutique killing two people. Joseph, who has ties to the Reds, escaped the attempt on his life.

Lamontagne said he didn’t know whether the shootings were connected.

“Two events that happen concurrently, it could look like that,” he said, referring to rumours of a gang war.

http://www.globalmontreal.com/top+gang+ban...5784/story.html



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Peter
Posted: Aug 15 2012, 10:50 PM


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Montreal police try to calm mafia war fears after multiple killings

Katherine Wilton, The Gazette : Wednesday, August 15, 2012 9:26 AM

MONTREAL - Montreal police broke their silence yesterday about the weekend killings of two prominent street gang members, saying they believe the targeted hits were likely the result of a dispute "between two people" and not a resumption of a street gang war on Montreal's streets.

"It's not a war," said Charles Mailloux, a chief inspector with the Montreal police.

Chénier Dupuy, leader of the Bo-Gars street gang, was gunned down Friday night in the Anjou borough.

A few hours later, Dupuy's business partner, Lamartine Sévère Paul, was killed outside his home in Laval.

Mailloux said the dispute was likely over revenue from "drug trafficking and control of certain territory."

He said he wasn't surprised to hear that Dupuy had been killed, but he refused to say who the notorious gang leader may have been in conflict with.

However, he did confirm that one hypothesis police are exploring is that Dupuy may have been purged because he wouldn't agree to work with his long-time rivals as part of a plan to unite the city's street gangs.

A source said Tuesday that it is "very possible" that a charismatic street gang leader named Gregory Wooley, who was released from prison last year after serving a 13-year sentence for various crimes, is trying to unify Montreal's rival gangs, the Blues and the Reds, under his leadership.

The street gangs, which have been traditionally based in St. Michel and Montreal North, have long been bitter rivals.

Mailloux confirmed that the street gangs have become more criminally sophisticated and now have the same stature as traditional criminal organizations like the Hells Angels.

The biker gang has had several members imprisoned over the past decade following large-scale police investigations aimed at dismantling their drug trafficking network.

Wooley, 40, used to be the bodyguard of Hells Angels leader Maurice (Mom) Boucher and is revered by many street gang members for being the first black man to be accepted by the Hells Angels in Quebec.

Wooley had been tried three times for two different murders committed during Quebec's biker gang war but was never convicted.

Although police are exploring the Wooley angle, they are also investigating whether the double slayings on the weekend could be linked to the impending return to Montreal of alleged Mafia boss Vito Rizzuto, who is expected to be released from a Colorado prison in October.

However, Mailloux said police have no confirmation that Rizzuto plans to return to Montreal. His house was put up for sale last year.

"We will see if he maintains his links with other (business) partners or leaves the country," he said.

The killing Saturday of Riccardo Ruffullo, who was found dead in a penthouse apartment downtown, is likely not linked to the street gang killings, police said. They suspect Ruffullo may have been killed over an outstanding debt.

Mailloux said police are keeping a close eye on Wooley as well as other members of the Hells Angels who will be released from prison soon after being rounded up in Operation Printemps in 2001, a police investigation that crippled the Hells Angels Nomad chapter, which was run by Boucher.

Mailloux said he believes there has been a decrease in the number of street gang-related homicides in Montreal - from 14 in 2007 to only two so far this year - because a special street gang unit called Project Eclipse has been in the gang members' faces.

"We are in the streets, in the bars and on the ground doing investigations," he said.
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Carmelo
Posted: Aug 20 2012, 02:44 PM


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Gang war reportedly sparked by biker street gang takeover

MONTREAL - A gang war that has claimed at least two victims started a few weeks ago north of Montreal with a splashy scene befitting a TV crime drama, according to a QMI media report, which cites an unnamed police source.

The story has it that alleged Bo-Gars street gang leader Chenier Dupuy (a gang sometimes known as the Reds), was invited along with several other street gang leaders to a meeting in Ste. Adele at which a top local Hells Angels gang leader explained that they would all be working together in the future.

Dupuy allegedly angrily refused the biker gang takeover and even slapped and swore at the biker gang leader in front of the others assembled before storming out.

Police, as the story goes, soon warned Dupuy that enemies had put a bounty on his head. But Dupuy did not keep a low profile and was even involved in a very public bar fight with rivals a few days later.

Dupuy was a physically powerful powerful man with a long rap sheet. He had survived a shooting in 2008 outside the Solid Gold strip club three days after being released from prison on weapons charges.

Later in 2008, Dupuy was pulled over in his girlfriend’s Lexus with a large quantity of cocaine, crack and marijuana, which he collected from a north-end garage run by an Italian-Montrealer.

Dupuy was sentenced to 78 months in prison in February 2011, of which only 20 months remained after time served while awaiting trial.

But after his release Dupuy was apparently back leading the gang this summer. And on Friday August, 10 weeks after the alleged Hells Angels meeting, Dupuy was shot dead in the parking lot at the Galeries d’Anjou.

Dupuy was accompanied at the time of his murder by former Pelletier street gang lieutenant Hansley Joseph, who was injured, but survived a shooting.

Joseph also had a criminal past, having been sentenced to 69 months in (five years and nine months) in February 2007 for his role as assistant to Bernard Mathieu of the Pelletier Gang.

The second confirmed gang-related murder last weekend took place just 36 hours after the Galeries d'Anjou shootings, as Lamartine Severe Paul, 42, was killed outside of his apartment in Chomedey, Laval.

Paul is said to have also rebuffed the Hells Angels along with Dupuy at the Ste. Adele meeting.

Paulo, as he was known on the streets, was a debt collector and cousin of Ducarme Joseph, who was targeted in a March 2010 attack in an Old Montreal clothing boutique, which resulted in two deaths.

The murder of a 22-year-old male in Ville St. Pierre Friday night is not yet known to be linked to the drug war, but authorities have noted that the victim was known to police.

There is much speculation that the drug war has been prompted by the impending release of alleged Montreal Mafia don Vito Rizzuto, who is to be released from a U.S. federal prison in Colorado October 6, after serving a murder rap.

Many of Rizzuto’s associates and family members were killed while he was behind bars.

The Mafia killings ended after Salvatore Montagna was murdered near Montreal on November 24, 2011.

http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/gang-war-report...keover-1.919746
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Carmelo
Posted: Sep 11 2012, 11:39 AM


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Police link Galloway Boys street gang to fatal Toronto shootings

It is one of Toronto’s longest-lasting and most dangerous gangs, with a history of violence that goes back more than a decade.

And on Tuesday, Toronto Police will outline why they believe the Galloway Boys gang is linked with some of this city’s most prominent recent homicides and shootings – including the deaths of two young people at a community barbecue on Danzig Street in Scarborough this summer.

No charges are expected to be laid Tuesday morning.

Joshua Yasay, 23, and Shyanne Charles, 14, were shot and killed and 23 others were injured when at least two people opened fire at the barbecue on July 16. Police have called the shooting one of the worst in the city’s history, and were quick to blame the violence on gang activity.

On Monday night, police announced that they believe the Galloway Boys, a gang whose home base is just one block west of the Danzig house where the shooting occurred, were linked to the deaths of Mr. Yasay and Ms. Charles. They also connected the gang to an eight-month-old homicide nearby, that of 24-year-old D’Mitre Barnaby. He was shot and killed at 3895 Lawrence Ave. East, a five-minute drive west of the Danzig Street shooting.

The gang is also linked to six other shootings that took place in Toronto between Sept. 4, 2011 and Aug. 10, 2012, police said.

“[The police] believe that the three homicides and six other shootings are linked, and that the Galloway gang has an integral part in these events,” said Constable Wendy Drummond.

The Galloway Boys are thought to be one of Toronto’s larger and better-organized gangs. Their territory is centred around the intersection of Kingston and Galloway Roads, a Scarborough neighbourhood of cheap apartment buildings and social housing in an area built for 1950s families with cars. The lack of transit here is a key barrier to more legitimate business opportunities, community organizers say.

The gang has a long-running feud stretching back decades with the Malvern Crew, a rival gang based in northern Scarborough.

The largest street-gang prosecution in Ontario’s history stemmed from that rivalry: Seventeen co-accused faced charges ranging from robbery and weapon possession to first-degree murder in connection with shootings in 2002 and 2004. Prosecutors said the killings caught innocent bystanders mistaken for members of the Malvern Crew. The case involved 17 defence lawyers, eight Crown prosecutors and security measures that were unprecedented at the time.

In 2009, Tyshan Riley, Phillip Atkins and Jason Wisdom were convicted of first-degree murder, attempted murder and committing murder for the benefit of a criminal organization.

Police believe the recent spate of shootings they say are linked to the Galloway Boys can be attributed to a mix of fighting within the Scarborough gang and external rivalries with members of other gangs, a source told The Globe and Mail. The police source did not point specifically to the Malvern Gang.

“Anytime that you can link nine major crimes like this that’s pretty significant,” the source said.

Two people have so far been charged in connection with the Danzig shooting: 18-year-old Shaquan Mesquito was charged with uttering threats and several gun-related offences. Police have said they have no evidence suggesting Mr. Mesquito was present when the shooting occurred.

Nahom Tsegazab, 19, was charged with reckless discharge of a firearm. He was among the people injured in the shooting, police have said.

Police have issued several pleas for information on the case, hoping some of the 100 or more people at the Danzig barbecue would come forward as witnesses.

“We have received some information, granted not enough to lay charges at this point,” Constable Drummond said. “It’s been some very in depth investigative work that’s taken place between the homicide squad and the divisions and [the] guns and gangs [unit] that have been able to link these cases.”

Police said they would provide more details about the shootings and homicides Tuesday morning, but do not expect to announce any further arrests or charges.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/toront...article4535443/
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