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Title: The Campisi Family


GangstersInc - April 5, 2006 10:22 AM (GMT)
Posted by pup on February 20, 2006 at 09:28:40:

Deal by Harvey Aronson about Ira Pecznick

To Drop A Dime

Boardwalk jungle by Ovid Demaris

Marked to die by Michael Brown over Gerard Festa


Perhaps fun to combine these books into one discussion on New Jersey and Newark, as a starter:

New Jersey, Philadelphia capo Caponigro
After Jerry Catena faded away from the picture, Caponigro's crew from Newark thought they could move in on the North Jersey territoy of the Genovese family. According to the book Boardwalk jungle by Ovid Demaris there were 18 gangland murders in the Port Newark area between 1971 and 1975 in their struggle.


Campisi family sentences
In january 1975 Peter Charles Campisi was sentenced to 20 years for murder. Around januari 1975 Ray Cagno gets 12 years for his role in the murder of William Kimbrough and the same month Anthony Campisi's son Peter pleds guilty to the murders of Trueba, Kimbrough and the murder of Domenick Luciano a Philadelphia family member. Anthony Campisi gets 10 years in 1975 for the murder of Trueba. In 1975 Peter "black" Salvatore Campisi got 25 years for murder he was the son of Charles Campisi and the nephew of "Nana" Campisi.

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Posted by David on February 20, 2006 at 11:18:20:
In Reply to: Campisi family discussion? (if intrested?) posted by pup on February 20, 2006 at 09:28:40:

My source: Deal by Harvey Aronson, read this book until page 127 and will read on.

One of my interests in the Campisis is, and perhaps there will be more info later on in the book, their activities in narcotics trafficking. Ira Pecznick says that in the early 70s the Campisis moved into narcotics. They started by dealing in quinine, which is used to cut heroin, and then started moving heroin themselves.

Two drug dealing factions: Petey White, John Tully, Tommy Campisi and Pecznick.
Other faction: Nana, Petey Black, Pipi and Carmen. The groups gambling was directed by Biaggio and P.A.

They obtained the heroin from two wiseguys known as Bootsie and Tony (who could they be?) in 1971 who hung out in a social club near Umberto's Clam House. Bootsie had served federal time for narcotics.

If anyone wants to know more about some of the murders carried out by the Campisis let me know.

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Posted by pup on February 21, 2006 at 19:10:56:
In Reply to: Re:Campisi family discussion? (if intrested?) posted by David on February 20, 2006 at 11:18:20:

Montreal
Giuseppe "Pep" Cotroni 's drugtrade was financed by Luigi Greco and Cotroni once told an undercover that 5 men in the US controlled the heroin market and prices, those customers of his were Angelo "Angie" Tuminaro, Rocco "Rocky" Sancinella, Anthony "Bootsie" DiPasqua, Frank Mancino and Anthony Strollo "Tony Bender", those were often financed by Squillante.

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Posted by David on February 21, 2006 at 11:37:55:
In Reply to: David posted by pup on February 21, 2006 at 09:15:14:

Campisi Family murders mentioned in Deal:

Maureen Campisi – because of her “fling” with gambling rival Dominick “Louis” Luciano disappeared in November 1969.

Gerald Mass (witness) – July 1, 1971 murdered by Petey Black who tried to choke him at first. Present were John Tully and Ira Pecznick.

William Foster Kimbrough – murdered on September 30, 1969. Involved in the hit were Petey Black, Pipi and Ray Cagno. Petey Black was the driver and shooter. Cagno couldn’t pull the trigger.

Dominick “Louis” Luciano – member of Anthony Caponegro's crew of the Philadelphia family. He was expanding his gambling into Campisi territory and was romancing Tommy Campisi’s wife Maureen. Was killed in 1971 on Feb. 12. Pecznick was the shooter together with Tommy Campisi.

Candido Trueba – right after the Louis Luciano killing the Campisis decided they should kill Trueba as well. Trueba had seen the Campisis when they were looking for Louis Luciano and were worried he would flip and send them to jail for the Luciano hit. Nana had reason to believe Trueba was a federal informer and had been snitching to government agents about counterfeit money the Campisis had spread around Newark. The Campisis lured Trueba to a craps game who they were going to cheat they told Trueba. The Campisis selected a house in Hillside, they didn’t know who lived there. They decided to murder Trueba at the back of the house. Nana, Pipi and Ira Pecznick were involved in the hit. Ira shot Trueba first in the chest from close range. Trueba was still alive and started running. Ira and Pipi fired at him. Pecznick saw Pipi walk up to Trueba and shoot him in the head.

William Pischedda – in the weeks that followed the Luciano and Trueba murders the Campisis began to suspect Pischedda was a rat or even worse, was trying to help the Luciano men to kill them. On Saturday, April 24, 1971 Pischedda went to a warehouse owned by a Campisi loanshark to collect his weekly dividend. But the loanshark wasn’t there, instead there were: Tommy Campisi, Petey White Campisi and John Tully. John Tully shot him first and Petey White finished the job, shooting Pischedda in the head.

GangstersInc - April 5, 2006 10:22 AM (GMT)
Posted by Tony67 on February 25, 2006 at 07:01:57:

In the book To Drop A Dime it says, Of the seven sons of Pietro and Fortunata Campisi, who had emigrated from Italy to the US at the turn of the century, and their nine sons-the cousins, as they were called-there was scarcely one without a lengthy criminal record. Five or Six of the seven brothers were "made men" members of the Mafia, listed on the FBI's organization charts as "button men"-or "soldiers"-in the Mafia family of the late Vito Genovese. But the Campisis were also a family within a "family" tightly knit, self-contained, pursuing their illegal activities with little regard for mob directives. Indeed, according to the authorities, to many top mobsters the Campisis were the outcasts of the underworld, too wild even by Mafia standards. Ruggiero-Richie the Boot-Boiardo, the patriarch of New Jerseys mobsters, reputeddly described them as "goddamn outlaw bastards." Also the book says, On February 12, 1971, the Campisis had killed a rival mob leader-Domininck Luciano who had been a "buttonman" under Angelo Bruno, the boss in Philadelphia, and two of Brunos emissaries had held a "sit-down" afterward with the Campisis. Petey Black had told Pecznick what was said. The meeting had been held at the home of Carmen Battaglia nominally the Campisis capo in the Genovese "family." Even though Na-Na had denied any involvement in the murder, Brunos men had no doubts that they were responsible and according to the Mafia code, demanded "satisfaction."




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